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orticoltural 










LIBRARY 

OF THE 

MASSACHUSETTS 

HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

BOSTON 



PRESENTED BY 

The Bqeiety 

1938 




1938 YEAR BOOK 

WITH THE 
ANNUAL REPORTS FOR 1937 



M ASSACH USETTS 

HORTICULTURAL 

SOCIETY 



PRICE 50 CENTS 



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1938 

YEAR BOOK 



OF THE 



MASSACHUSETTS 
HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 




WITH THE 

ANNUAL REPORTS 
FOR 1937 



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Foreword 



The Committee on Lectures and Publications has the honor 
to present herewith the fifteenth number of the Society's 
Year Book, with which is combined the annual reports for the 
year 1937. 

Robert G. Stone, Chairman. 
Boston, Mass. 
May 20, 1938. 



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Table of Contents 

Foreword ' . • 3 

Officers for 1938 . . 4 9 

Committees for 1938 11 

Medals and Certificates Awarded in 1937 13 

Special Awards in 1937 24 

Frederick Law Olmsted *. . . . 27 

Passing of Charles J. Sander 28 

Some Books the Gardener Should Know 29 

Exhibitions in 1938 34 

Library Accessions . . 45 

Gifts to the Library 50 

Periodicals Received, 1937 52 

Garden Clubs Not Members of the Massachusetts Federa- 
tion .... 57 

Life Members Not Located 62 

Benevolent Fraternity Fruit and Flower Mission . . . 63 

Necrology 64 

Death of the Oldest Member . 65 

Annual Meeting, 1938 .69 

President's Address 69 

Report of the Secretary 73 

Report of the Treasurer 76 

Report of the Library Committee 86 

Report of the Exhibition Committee . . . . . . . 88 

Report of the Prize Committee 92 

Report of the Committee on the Exhibition of the 

Products of Children's Gardens 95 

Result of the Balloting 96 

Honorary Member 97 

Corresponding Members 97 

New Members . 100 

Form of Bequest /" , . . 115 



List of Illustrations 

Edwin S. Webster, President " 8 

Elmer D. Merrill, Trustee 10 

William P. Wolcott. Trustee 12 

Dr. A. B. Stout 22 

J. E. Spingarn 22 

Richard Wellington 23 

Alfred Render 23 

Frederick Law Olmsted 27 

Stage exhibit at the Spring Show 36 

Garden clubs' exhibit at the Spring Show 37 

Lily display of Mr. and Mrs. M. M. Van Beuren .... 38 
Blacksmith shop exhibit of Tow Path Gardens .... 39 

Mirror garden exhibit of Little Tree Farms 40 

Azalea exhibit of Mr. and Mrs. Ben: P. P. Mosely ... 41 
Modern bulb garden exhibit of Dr. and Mrs. Homer Gage 42 

Modern house and roof garden 43 

Rock garden of the American Rock Garden Society ... 44 
Chrysanthemum exhibit of Mrs. Francis B. Crowninshield, 

awarded the Albert C. Burrage gold vase 66 

Estate of Mrs. William Hewson Baltzell 68 

Chrysanthemum exhibit of Edwin S. Webster 74 

Garden of Mrs. Charles C. Griswold 77 

Courtyard of Massachusetts Mutual Life Insurance Com- 
pany's building 81 

New City Hall in Newton 88 

Horace James Circle 94 

"Grandmother's Garden" 99 




Mr. Edwin S. Webster 

Re-elected President of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society at the 
annual meeting May 2, 1938. 



THE BOARD OF GOVERNMENT 



OF THE 



MASSACHUSETTS 
HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

President 

EDWIN S. WEBSTER 

Vice-Presidents 

William Ellery 
Oakes Ames 

Trustees 

*John S. Ames Harlan P. Kelsey (1939) 

*Oakes Ames *Nathaniel T. Kidder 

♦Francis H. Appleton Elmer D. Merrill (1941) 

George W. Butterworth (1940) Robert H. Roland (1940) 

Miss Marian Roby Case (1939) Harold S. Ross (1941) 

Mrs. S. V. R. Crosby (1940) Louis A. Shaw (1939) 

Charles K. Cummings (1939) Robert G. Stone (1940) 

♦William Ellery Mrs. Bayard Thayer (1941) 

Samuel J. Goddard (1941) Mrs. Roger S. Warner (1939) 

Walter Hunnewell (1940) *Edwin S. Webster 

William P. Wolcott (1941) 



Treasurer 

John S. Ames 

Secretary 

Edward I. Farrengton 



♦Members ex officio 
Dates given are those of expiration of terms 




Dr. Elmer D. Merrill 
Elected a Trustee at the annual meeting in 1938. 



COMMITTEES OF THE SOCIETY 
For the Year Ending May 1, 1939 

Executive Committee 

EDWIN S. WEBSTER, Chairman 
JOHN S. AMES WILLIAM ELLERY 

OAKES AMES MRS. BAYARD THAYER 

Finance Committee 

EDWIN S. WEBSTER, Chairman 
JOHN S. AMES ROBERT G. STONE 

Membership Committee 

LOUIS A. SHAW, Chairman 
ELMER D. MERRILL WILLIAM P. WOLCOTT 

Budget Committee 

EDWIN S. WEBSTER, Chairman 
JOHN S. AMES WILLIAM ELLERY 

OAKES AMES ROBERT G. STONE 

MRS. BAYARD THAYER 

Committee on Exhibitions 

RAY M. KOON, Chairman 
SAMUEL J. GODDARD THOMAS MILNE 

ELMER D. MERRILL VEASEY F. PEIRCE 

Committee on Prizes 

ROBERT H. ROLAND, Chairman 
JOSEPH T. DAVIS JAMES METHVEN 

WALTER HUNNEWELL WILLIAM P. WOLCOTT 

Committee on Library 

NATHANIEL T. KIDDER, Chairman 
MRS. S. V. R. CROSBY CHARLES K. CUMMINGS 

Committee on Lectures and Publications 

ROBERT G. STONE, Chairman 
ELMER D. MERRILL LOUIS A. SHAW 

Committee on Special Medals 

OAKES AMES, Chairman 
HARLAN P. KELSEY ROBERT H. ROLAND 

RAY M. KOON HAROLD S. ROSS 

Committee on Gardens 

MRS. ROGER S. WARNER, Chairman 
MRS. JOHN S. AMES GEORGE W. BUTTERWORTH 

MRS. ALBERT C. BURRAGE, JR. WILLIAM ELLERY 

LOUIS A. SHAW 
Committee on Building 

CHARLES K. CUMMINGS, Chairman 
EDWIN S. WEBSTER SAMUEL J. GODDARD 

Committee on Children's Garden Exhibitions 

MISS MARIAN ROBY CASE, Chairman 
THOMAS P. DOOLEY DANIEL W. O'BRIEN 

Committee on the Albert C. Burrage Gold Vase 

WALTER HUNNEWELL, Chairman 
ALBERT C. BURRAGE, JR. ROBERT H. ROLAND 

RAY M. KOON HAROLD S. ROSS 

Nominating Committee 

GEORGE W. BUTTERWORTH WALTER HUNNEWELL 

MRS. S. V. R. CROSBY ROBERT H. ROLAND 

ROBERT G. STONE 




Mr. William P. Wolcott 

Elected a Trustee at the annual meeting in 1938. 



Medals and Certificates Awarded 

in 1937 

The Albert C. Burrage Gold Vase 

Mr. and Mrs. Francis B. Crowninshield, for a chrysanthemum garden 
at the Autumn Show. 

George Robert White Medal of Honor 

Frederick Law Olmsted, for eminent service in horticulture. 

Thomas Roland Medal 

Dr. A. B. Stout, Xew York Botanical Garden, for his work in breeding 
daylilies and other plants. 

Jackson Dawson Memorial Medal 

J. E. Spingarn, Amenia, X. Y., for his work in breeding and propagating 
clematis. 

H. H. Hunnewell Medal 
Estate of Airs. William Hewson Baltzell (Elm Bank), Wellesley. 

President's Cup 

Thomas Roland, Inc., for a group of Acacia pubescens at the Spring 
Show. 

Gold Medal of the Horticultural Society of New York 

Cape Ann Garden Club, for an enclosed garden at the Spring Show. 

Gold Medal of the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society 
L. Sherman Adams Company, for a group of orchids at the Spring Show. 

Royal Horticultural Society's Cup 
Gardner Museum, for a group of jasmine at the Spring Show. 

Silver Cup 
A. Frylink & Sons, Inc., for an exhibit of daffodils. 

Crystal Vases 

Mrs. Maurice J. Curran, for an exhibit of daffodils. 
Edwin S. Webster, for an exhibit of daffodils. 
Edwin S. Webster, for a display of tulips. 
Mrs. C. G. Weld, for a daffodil garden. 

Large Gold Medals 

Lord Aberconway, England, for his distinguished service to horticulture. 

13 



14 MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

Alfred Render, Arnold Arboretum, long prominent in the field of 

botany. 
Richard Wellington, Geneva, N. Y., for his work as a fruit breeder. 

Gold Medals 

L. Sherman Adams Company, for a group of orchids. 

L. Sherman Adams Company, for a group of orchids at the Spring Show. 

H. J. Borowski & Sons, for a group of jasmine at the Spring Show. 

Joseph Breck & Sons, for a daffodil border. 

Joseph Breck & Sons, for a display of daffodils at the Spring Show. 

Joseph Breck & Sons, for a Dutch farm scene and bulb field at the 

Spring Show. 
Cape Cod Horticultural Society, Inc., for an exhibit of daffodils at 

the Spring Show. 
Cherry Hill Nurseries, for azaleas, rhododendrons and peonies. 
W. N. Craig, for a display of hardy lilies. 
Mr. and Mrs. Francis B. Crowninshield, for a group of chrysanthemums 

arranged as a garden. 
Mrs. Francis B. Crowninshield, for a display of sweet peas. 
Mrs. Maurice J. Curran, for a Dutch garden at the Spring Show. 
Will C. Curtis, for a naturalistic planting of hardy ferns at the Spring 

Show. 
Hubert K. Dalton, Rumson, N. J., for a collection of orchids at New 

York Fall Show. 
Ormond Hamilton, for a naturalistic planting of hardy ferns at the 

Spring Show. 
Egbert Hans, for his work at the Spring Show (Holland Exhibit). * 
Alexander I. Heimlich, for a ledge garden at the Spring Show. 
Huntingdon Valley Garden Club, for a birdbath with planting at the 

Philadelphia show. 
Massachusetts State College, for a wild flower garden showing propaga- 
tion of native plants. 
New York Agricultural Experiment Station, for a comprehensive display 

of seedling apples, grapes and filberts. 
A. N. Pierson, Inc., for a display of roses at the Spring Show. 
Miniature rose garden — design and execution, exhibited by Miss Mary 

Franklin at the Spring Show. 
John Scheepers, Inc., for a display of liliums — species and hybrids. 
Tow Path Gardens, for an informal garden at the Spring Show. 
Mr. & Mrs. M. M. Van Beuren, for a group of chrysanthemums with 

suitable accessories. 
Watuppa Orchards, for 45 varieties of apples. 
Edwin S. Webster, for a group of chrysanthemums with suitable 

accessories. 



MEDALS AND CERTIFICATES AWARDED IN 1937 15 

Edwin S. Webster, for a group of flowering and foliage plants at the 

Spring Show. 
Edwin S. Webster, for a group of orchids at the Spring Show. 

Silver Medals 

J. Herbert Alexander, for a display of dahlias. 

Aquarium Club of the Teachers College, for a water plant exhibit at 

the Spring Show. 
Bay State Nurseries, Inc., Hedge Plant Booth, for general excellence of 

trade booth at the Spring Show. 
Joseph Breck & Sons, for general excellence of trade booth at the 

Spring Show. 
Butler & Ullman, Inc., for a display of gardenias at the Spring Show. 
F. I. Carter & Sons, for a group of cacti and succulents. 
Central Experimental Farm (Ottawa), for a collection of Ottawa 

named seedling apple varieties. 
Cherry Hill Nurseries, for a section of a June garden at the Spring 

Show. 
Corliss Brothers, Inc., for an early October border. 
Corliss Brothers, Inc., for a rose garden at the Spring Show. 
W. N. Craig, for a collection of rock plants. 
W. N. Craig, for a collection of perennials and bulbous plants. 
W. N. Craig, for a display of perennials and lilies. 
Mrs. George R. Fearing, for a group of Helleborus niger. 
Mrs. George D. Forbes, for her estate, Orchard Farm, at North Egre- 

mont. 
Fraser's Flowers, for a group of chrysanthemums arranged in the 

Japanese manner. 
A. Frylink and Sons, Inc., for the best daffodil bloom in the show 

(Seraglio). 
George Peabody Gardner, Jr., for a group of white flowering plants. 
Thomas J. Grey Company, for general excellence of trade booth at 

the Spring Show. 
Mrs. Charles C. Griswold, for her estate, Hillhouse, at Stockbridge. 
R. E. Henderson and Company, for general excellence of trade booth 

at the Spring Show. 
A House & Garden Center and The Artisans, for general excellence 

of trade booth at the Spring Show. 
Mrs. Lillian Hovey, for the terrarium scoring the highest number of 

points. 
Jamaica Plain High School, for a naturalistic exhibit. 
Walter Leonard, for a display of Fairfax strawberries. 
Lohrman Seed Company, for general excellence of trade booth at the 

Spring Show. 



16 MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

Massachusetts Audubon Society, Inc., for birds of a May garden at 

the Spring Show. 
Massachusetts State College, for a collection of seedling Mcintosh 

apples. 
Wilbur J. Munroe, for a display of gourds. 
North Street Greenhouses, for a group of Rex begonias. 
Rose Tom Thumb, exhibited by The Conard-Pyle Company at the 

Spring Show. 
Fifth Grade Pupils of the Runkle School, for a model of a country 

place at the Spring Show. 
John Sullivan, for best begonia plant (Sport of Emily Clibran). 
Mrs. M. M. Van Beuren, for a display of miscellaneous flowers at the 

Spring Show. 
Mrs. M. M. Van Beuren, for a group of cinerarias at the Spring Show. 
Mrs. M. M. Van Beuren, for a group of Lilium candidum at the Spring 

Show. 
Waltham Field Station, for a collection of fall asters. 
Botany Department of Wheaton College, for the most meritorious 

terrarium at the Spring Show. 
Mrs. Geoffrey G. Whitney, for Origanum dictamnus or Turner's "Righte 

Dittany," at the Spring Show. 
Yamanaka & Co., for Japanese flower arrangements. 
Miss Madeline Young, for 35 varieties of apples, 12 in a plate. 

Bronze Medals 

Joseph Breck & Sons, for a group of nicotiana and begonias. 

Miss Margaret B. Brigham, for a display of Indian corn. 

W. Atlee Burpee Company, for general excellence of trade booth at the 

Spring Show. 
Butterworth's, for a group of cypripediums arranged to display the 

natural habitat. 
Cherry Hill Nurseries, for seedling peonies. 
W. N. Craig, for a container of rock plants. 
W. N. Craig, for a display of hardy perennials. 

Frank Edgar Company, for a collection of flowering and foliage plants. 
Gardner Museum, for a group of chrysanthemums. 
Ormond Hamilton, for general excellence of trade booth at the Spring 

Show. 
Houghton-Mifflin Company, for general excellence of trade booth at 

the Spring Show. 
W. W. Howard, for a display of carnations and miscellaneous flowers 

at the Spring Show. 
Jamaica Plain High School, for a collection of flowers and vegetables. 
Fred Kunan, for 12 cyclamen plants. 



MEDALS AND CERTIFICATES AWARDED IN 1937 17 

Lord & Burnham Co., for general excellence of trade booth at the 

Spring Show. 
Garden Club Federation of Massachusetts, for general excellence of trade 

booth at the Spring Show. 
Miss Sandra Newland, for a collection of marigolds. 
Mrs. R. M. Saltonstall, for a display of achimenes. 
Mrs. R. M. Saltonstall, for a display of flowering plants. 
Vaughan's Seed Store, for general excellence of trade booth at the 

Spring Show. 

Bronze Medals for Children's Gardens, Uonated by 

Miss Marian Roby Case, Hillcrest Gardens, 

Weston, Massachusetts 

Albert Amerigian, Campello. August Enos, Santuit. 

Elizabeth A. Barney, West Rox- Margaret Finlayson, Billerica. 

bury. John P. McDonough, Hanover. 

Peter Bazakas, Marlboro. Charlotte Moran, Winchester. 

Ellen Beluinas, Montague, Sandra Newland, Roslindale. 

John Birchall, Dedham. Alica Porier, Dodgeville. 

Charles Botelho, East Falmouth. George Robinson, Boxboro. 

Marjorie Brett, Great Barrington. Mary Schobel, Rehoboth. 

Andrew J. Buchan, Wrentham. G. Freeman Sellers, Abington. 

Arthur Burgess, Fairview. Gloria and Virginia Tripp, West- 
Robert Butcher, West Concord. port. 

Nicholas Campanelli, Brockton. Ethel Turner, Montello. 

Susan Cernak, Easthampton. Hansgerd Uhlig, Pittsfield. 

Paul Clark, Williamsburg. Stanley Vaill, Monson. 

Anna Davidson, Westfield. Arthur Wood, Greenfield. 

Gerard Desrosier, Perkins Insti- Ernest J. Zevitas, Brookline. 

tution for the Blind. 

First Class Certificate 

Brassolaeliocattleya truffautiana aurea, exhibited by L. Sherman Adams 
Company. 

Carnation Dictator, exhibited by the Denver Wholesale Florist Com- 
pany. 

Cypripedium Grace Darling, var. Purity, exhibited by Orchidvale, Mrs. 
A. C. Burrage. 

Rose Signora, exhibited by White Brothers Rose Corporation. 

Award of Merit 

Ageratum Ruth Golby, exhibited by Walter H. Golby. 
Aster Harrington's Pink, exhibited by the Waltham Field Station. 
Aster Mt. Rainier, exhibited by the Waltham Field Station. 
Aster subcaeruleus, Star of Wartburg, exhibited by the Waltham Field 
Station. 



18 MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

Azalea sanderi arethusa, exhibited by H. J. Borowski & Sons. 
Begonia Crystal Queen, exhibited by Joseph Breck and Sons. 
Brassocattleya Albion, exhibited by Orchidvale, Mrs. A. C. Burrage. 
Carnation Ditchling, exhibited by J. J. LaMontagne & Son. 
Carnation Hermosa, exhibited by S. J. Goddard. 
Chrysanthemum Little America, exhibited by Tom Knipe. 
Coelogyne mooreana, Westonbirt var., exhibited by Orchidvale, Mrs. 

A. C. Burrage. 
Cypripedium Albion, exhibited by Edwin S. Webster. 
Cypripedium Ballet Girl, exhibited by Orchidvale, Mrs. A. C. Burrage. 
Cypripedium Renown, exhibited by L. Sherman Adams Company. 
Cypripedium Sumurun, exhibited by Orchidvale, Mrs. A. C. Burrage. 
Cypripedium Wellesley, exhibited by L. Sherman Adams Company. 
Echeveria gibbiflora eodactyla, exhibited by S. J. Goddard. 
Laeliocattleya Cavalese, var. magnifica, exhibited by Orchidvale, Mrs. 

A. C. Burrage. 
Lilium davuricum luteum, exhibited by John Scheepers, Inc. 
Lilium tenuijolium, var. Red Star, exhibited by John Scheepers, Inc. 
Lycaste tunstilli, exhibited by Orchidvale, Mrs. A. C. Burrage. 
Marigold Crown of Gold, exhibited by Mrs. Elizabeth M. Marcy. 
Odontioda Brackenhurst, exhibited by Orchidvale, Mrs. A. C. Burrage. 
Odontioda Coronation, var. Prince of Wales, exhibited by Orchidvale, 

Mrs. A. C. Burrage. 
Odontioda Nobsworth, exhibited by Orchidvale, Mrs. A. C. Burrage. 
Phlox Pinwheel, exhibited by Beatrice Gardens. 
Primula malacoides Royalty, exhibited by Mrs. R. M. Saltonstall. 
Rhododendron cornubia, exhibited by H. J. Borowski & Sons. 
Rosa rouletti, exhibited by the Conard-Pyle Company. 
Rose Lestra Hibberd, exhibited by the Hill Floral Products Company. 
Rose Queen Mary, exhibited by A. N. Pierson, Inc. 
Rose Radiant Beauty, exhibited by Cleveland Cut Flower Company. 
Rose Signet, exhibited by The Montgomery Co., Inc. 
Snapdragon Lothrop, exhibited by C. H. Lothrop. 
Sophrolaeliocattleya His Majesty, exhibited by Orchidvale, Mrs. A. C. 

Burrage. 
Sweet Pea Gigantic, exhibited by Mrs. Francis B. Crowninshield. 
Tulipa acuminata, exhibited by Edwin S. Webster. 
Tulipa fosteriana, Red Emperor, exhibited by H. S. Ross. 

Vote of Commendation 

Brassocattleya Pegasus, exhibited by Orchidvale, Mrs. A. C. Burrage. 
Carnation Dairy Maid, exhibited by J. J. LaMontagne & Son. 
Carnation Guy Allwood, exhibited by J. J. LaMontagne & Son. 
Clematis, lanuginosa hybrids, exhibited by Louis Vasseur. 
Clematis, patens hybrids, exhibited by Louis Vasseur. 



MEDALS AND CERTIFICATES AWARDED IN 1937 19 

Chrysanthemum Sunny Boy, exhibited by Corliss Brothers, Inc. 

Helleborus niger, exhibited by Milton Nurseries. 

Lachenalia boundi, exhibited by W. N. Craig. 

Marica coerulea, exhibited by W. N. Craig. 

Marigold Crown of Gold, exhibited by W. Atlee Burpee Co. 

Peony L'Etincelante, exhibited by F. E. Cremer. 

Poppy Amelia Earhart, exhibited by James I. Riddell. 

Primula malacoides Royalty, exhibited by Mrs. R. M. Saltonstall. 

Rose Fantasy, exhibited by Butler & Ullman, Inc. 

Vanda coerulea, exhibited by L. Sherman Adams Company. 

Zantedeschia Reehmanni, exhibited by Edwin S. Webster. 

Cultural Certificate 

H. J. Borowski & Sons, for Azalea sanderi Black Hawk. 

H. J. Borowski & Sons, for Azalea sanderi North Star. 

H. J. Borowski & Sons for Azalea sanderi Ruby. 

H. J. Borowski & Sons, for Azalea sanderi Tecumseh. 

H. J. Borowski & Sons, for Azalea sanderi Vulstiana. 

G. S. Bradley, for Coelogyne cristata. 

G. S. Bradley, for Epidendrum fragrans. 

John S. Doig, for Cypripedium Grace Darling, var. Purity. 

John S. Doig, for Ly caste skinneri. 

John S. Doig, for Lycaste tunstillii. 

John S. Doig, for Masdevallia tovarensis. 

John S. Doig, for Odontioda Chantecler. 

John S. Doig, for Odontoglossum Edwardi. 

John S. Doig, for Odontoglossum rossii majus. 

John Ellis, for Cyclamen persicum, original species. 

Karl Fischer, for a group of Helleborus niger. 

C. Harry Frost, for Cyclamen persicum, White Triumph and Triumph 

Crimson. 
C. Harry Frost, for a group of poinsettias. 
Department of Horticulture, University of Illinois, for a display of 

grapes. 
Keown's Orchards, for a display of fruit in widest possible variety. 
Mrs. Ruth P. Merry, for pheasant breasted aloe. 
Frederick Pocock, for Cypripedium jairrieanum. 
John Sullivan, for a group of cyclamen. 
Watuppa Orchards, for pear Flemish Beauty. 
Joseph Winsock, for a display of miscellaneous flowers. 
Joseph Winsock, for Orriithogalum speciosum. 

Vote of Thanks 

Harold T. Bent, for a vase of Yellow Normandie chrysanthemums, 
Joseph Breck and Sons, for a vase of montbretias. 



20 MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

L. G. Bruggemann, for two watermelons. 

Mrs. S. V. R. Crosby, for Brunjelsia paucifolia. 

Mrs. John. S. Curtis, for a group of white seedling chrysanthemums. 

T. F. Donahue, for a display of peonies. 

Albert G. Frothingham, for double nasturtium with zinnia-like flower. 

Helen C. Gilbert, for vase of Helleborus niger. 

J. J. LaMontagne & Son, for Carnation Dimity. 

Mrs. M. J. Merrill, for Josselyn gooseberries. 

Henry L. F. Naber, for chicory. 

North Shore Dahlia Gardens, for a collection of china asters. 

William D. Quint, for vase of peonies. 

Mrs. R. M. Saltonstall, for Dicentra spectabilis. 

Mrs. R. M. Saltonstall, for schizanthus. 

Mrs. Hermine Schulz, for lunaria. 

Mrs. Willis S. Shepard, for Epiphyllum truncation. 

Elmer D. Smith & Co., for a collection of seedling chrysanthemums. 

Symphony Flower Shop, for a bowl of assorted flowers. 

Symphony Flower Shop, for vases of miscellaneous flowers. 

Botanical Certificate 

Angraecum distichum, exhibited by Orchidvale, Mrs. A. C. Burrage. 
Brassavola nodosa, exhibited by Orchidvale, Mrs. A. C. Burrage. 
Bulbophyllum morphoglossum, exhibited by Orchidvale, Mrs. A. C. 

Burrage. 
Cirrhopetalum picturatum, exhibited by Orchidvale, Mrs. A. C. Burrage. 
Cyclamen persicum, original species, exhibited by F. W. Hunnewell. 
Eria globifera, exhibited by Orchidvale, Mrs. A. C. Burrage. 

Honorable Mention 

Azalea Blushing Bride, exhibited by Mrs. R. M. Saltonstall. 

Azalea Firefly, exhibited by Mrs. John S. Curtis. 

Azalea single white, exhibited by Mrs. R. M. Saltonstall. 

Pink Camellias, exhibited by James J. Hurley. 

White Camellias, exhibited by James J. Hurley. 

Carnation Greatheart, exhibited by J. J. LaMontagne & Son. 

Cattleya trianae, exhibited by Orchidvale, Mrs. A. C. Burrage. 

Chorizema ilicifolium, exhibited by Mrs. R. M. Saltonstall. 

Coronilla glauca, exhibited by Mrs. R. M. Saltonstall. 

Cypripedium insigne, exhibited by W. N. Craig. 

Cypripedium insigne Sanderae, exhibited by W. N. Craig. 

Plate Garden, exhibited by Mrs. E. I. Comins. 

Laelio cattleya Cavalese, var. magnifica, exhibited by Orchidvale, Mrs. 

A. C. Burrage. 
Group of Libonia floribunda, exhibited by Walter H. Golby. 



MEDALS AND CERTIFICATES AWARDED IN 1937 21 

Basket of Marigold Yellow Supreme and Flaming Velvet Petunia, 

exhibited by Mrs. Elizabeth M. Marcy. 
Nandiana domestica, exhibited by W. N. Craig. 
Collection of Christmas flowering plants, exhibited by Mrs. R. M. 

Saltonstall. 
Flowering Plants, exhibited by Mrs. A. C. Burrage. 
Flowering Plants, exhibited by Mrs. Maurice J. Curran. 
Orchid Plants, exhibited by F. W. Hunnewell. 
French Ranunculus, exhibited by Mrs. R. M. Saltonstall. 
Vase of Bismarck Stock, exhibited by Wilfrid Wheeler. 
Vase of Tithonia speciosa, exhibited by Harold T. Bent. 
Winter bouquet, exhibited by the West Roxbury Garden Club. 
Wreath constructed of natural plant material for outdoor decoration 

only, exhibited by the Merry Weeders. 
Wreath constructed of artificial material or of artificial and natural 

material suitable for indoor decoration only, exhibited by Garden 

Section, Amherst Woman's Club. 

Blue Ribbon Garden Certificate 

City of Westfield, for " Grandmother's Garden." 

Committee on Planting Trees, Brookline, for the planting in Horace 

James Circle, corner Hammond Street and the Parkway. 
Alfred H. Marchant, for his extensive and complete wild garden. 

Garden Certificate 

City of Newton, for the planting around City Hall. 
Massachusetts Mutual Life Insurance Company, Springfield, for the 
planting of its grounds. 



22 



MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 




Dr. A. B. Stout 

Awarded the 

Thomas Roland Medal 

in 1937. 



Mr. J. E. Spingarn 

Awarded the 

Jackson Dawson Memorial 

Medal in 1937. 




MEDALS AND CERTIFICATES AWARDED IN 1937 



23 



Mr. Richard Wellington 

Awarded the 

Society's gold medal 

in 1937. 





Dr. Alfred Rehder 

Awarded the 

Society's gold medal 

in 1937. 



Special Awards in 1937 

Late in 1937 the Trustees made several medal awards on 
recommendation of the special medal committee, which con- 
sisted of Professor Oakes Ames, Mr. William Ellery, Mr. 
Harlan P. Kelsey, Mr. Harold S. Ross and Mr. Wilfrid 
Wheeler. 

The George Robert White Medal of Honor, which is con- 
sidered the outstanding horticultural award in America, was 
given to Mr. Frederick Law Olmsted, distinguished landscape 
architect of Brookline, Mass. Mr. Olmsted is known in all 
parts of the country for his work in landscape design and 
particularly in the development of public parks. 

The Thomas Roland Medal, which is awarded each year for 
skill in horticulture, was given to Dr. A. B. Stout of the New 
York Botanical Garden, special emphasis being laid on his 
work in the breeding and propagation of daylilies. 

The Jackson Dawson Memorial Medal was voted to Mr. 
J. E. Spingarn of Amenia, N. Y. This medal is awarded each 
year to someone who has excelled in the breeding or propaga- 
tion of woody plants. Mr. Spingarn is known internationally 
for his work with the clematis, which he has helped to popu- 
larize by his writings. 

The Society's large gold medal was awarded to Lord Aber- 
conway, V.M.H., president of the Royal Horticultural Society, 
for distinguished service in the field of horticulture. Lord 
Aberconway attended three of the large Spring flower shows 
in the eastern states in 1937 and impressed all who met him 
with his wide knowledge of plants and plant cultivation. 

The Society's large gold medal was voted to Mr. Richard 
Wellington of the agricultural experiment station at Geneva, 
N. Y., for his work in the breeding of fruits, which has ex- 
tended over a long period. Mr. Wellington has been in full 
charge of the fruit-breeding work at the experiment station 
since 1920 and has made virtually all of the crosses which 
have been undertaken in that period. 

The Society's large gold medal was also awarded to Dr. 
Alfred Rehder, curator of the Arnold Arboretum in Jamaica 
Plain, Mass. Dr. Rehder has long been prominent in the field 
of botany. 

24 



SPECIAL MEDAL AWARDS 25 

It was voted at the same meeting of the Trustees to adopt 
the recommendation of the Committee on the Albert C. Bur- 
rage Gold Vase that this vase be awarded to Mrs. Francis 
B. Crowninshield of Boston and Marblehead for her exhibit 
at the Autumn Flower Show. This award is made in De- 
cember of each year for the most outstanding exhibit at any 
of the society's shows in the course of the twelve months. The 
committee making the 1937 award consisted of Mr. Walter 
Hunnewell, Mr. Albert C. Burrage, Jr., Mr. William Ellery, 
Mr. Robert H. Roland and Mr. Harold S. Ross. 

The Committee on Gardens also made its report at this 
meeting and several awards were made on its recommendation. 
This committee consisted of Mrs. Roger S. Warner, Mrs. John 
S. Ames, Mrs. Albert C. Burrage, Jr., Mr. George W. Butter- 
worth and Mr. Louis A. Shaw. 

The H. H. Hunnewell Gold Medal, which is only given for 
estates, was awarded to Mrs. William Hewson Baltzell for her 
estate in Dover known as "Elm Bank." This estate is noted 
for its lawns and trees as well as for its attractive design. 

A silver medal was awarded to Mrs. George D. Forbes of 
North Egremont for her estate known as "Orchard Farm" and 
another to Mrs. Charles C. Griswold for her estate at Stock- 
bridge called "Hillhouse." 

It was voted to award a blue-ribbon certificate to a garden 
at Westfield, Mass., which is known as "Grandmother's Gar- 
den" and which is maintained as a public project. This garden, 
colonial in type, was developed under the direction of Mrs. 
Albert E. Fowler, the design being drawn by Thomas Des- 
mond of Simsbury, Conn. The garden is surrounded by a 
traditional white picket fence, and the paths are paved with 
stones from old walls. A sundial in the center rests on an 
ancient millstone and from it radiate beds bordered with hand- 
made bricks. In the planting are herb and lily gardens. The 
garden was named in honor of a woman widely known as 
Grandmother Steiger, an enthusiastic gardener during her 
long life. 

A blue-ribbon certificate was also voted to Alfred H. Mar- 
chant of Winchester, Mass., for an extensive wild garden, 
where hundreds of native American wild flowers from New 
England and from more distant states are growing under 
natural conditions. Mr. Marchant, a Boston advertising man. 



26 MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

has been unusually successful in growing Epigoea repens and 
other wild flowers which are considered difficult to handle. 

An unusual award was that of a blue-ribbon certificate to a 
circle at the corner of two streets in Brookline which has been 
planted with exceptional skill and good taste. The design for 
the planting was made by Sidney ShurclifT, landscape archi- 
tect of Boston, and work was done by the Brookline Com- 
mittee on Planting Trees, E. B. Dane, chairman. 

Two other rather exceptional awards were made. One was a 
garden certificate given to the City of Newton, Mass., for the 
excellent planting to be found around the new city hall. The 
other was a garden certificate to the Massachusetts Mutual 
Life Insurance Company of Springfield, Mass., for the plant- 
ing of the grounds around the home of that organization. It 
was felt that these two plantings were inspirational and that 
they might be considered as object lessons for the encourage- 
ment of similar undertakings. 




Mr. Frederick Law Olmsted 

Awarded the George Robert White Medal of 
Honor in 1937. 

Frederick Law Olmsted 

For the first time the George W. White Medal of Honor was 
awarded to a landscape architect in 1937. This honor was con- 
ferred upon Mr. Frederick Law Olmsted of Brookline. Mr. 
Olmsted has long been an ornament to the profession of land- 
scape architecture. His work is to be found in many parts of 
the country and he has occupied many important positions. 

Mr. Olmsted was born in 1870 and after graduating from 
Harvard College became an assistant in his father's firm, the 
members of which were already among the best known land- 
scape architects in the country. He put in thirteen months' 
continuous work on the Biltmore Estate in western North 
Carolina, which gave him a wide working knowledge of 
landscape architecture in all its branches, including the han- 
dling of forest and park lands, the construction of roads and 
the making of gardens. Throughout his career he had much to 

27 



28 MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

do with the planning and laying out of public parks, parkways 
and recreation facilities. He said himself in the Harvard Year 
Book, class of 1894, "Public work for the direct benefit of large 
numbers of persons has always appealed to me in essence but 
it suffers from the drawbacks and disappointments cast about 
it by our defective methods of public administration." 

In 1910 Mr. Olmsted was appointed by President Taft a 
member of the Committee of Fine Arts established by Congress 
and was reappointed in 1914. In 1910 he became chairman of 
the Executive Committee which conducted the second Na- 
tional Conference on City Planning and was repeatedly re- 
elected. He became a member of the Brookline Planning 
Board in 1914. 

In 1898 Mr. Olmsted became a partner with his cousin, John 
Charles Olmsted, under the name of Olmsted Brothers, carry- 
ing on the business which was founded by his father. 



Passing of Charles J. Sander 

The late Charles J. Sander, who passed away in February, 
became a member of this Society on April 10, 1897. He was 
very well known for his work as superintendent on the estate 
of the late Professor Charles S. Sargent, director of the Arnold 
Arboretum. 

Mr. Sander was born in Bremen, Germany, January 23, 1847. 
He worked as a sailor for a time but took out citizenship 
papers in the United States in 1868. He was married in 1874 
and for three years worked under Francis Parkman, the fa- 
mous historian, who was at one time president of this Society. 
Then he went to Holm Lea, the Brookline Estate of Professor 
Sargent, where he remained for fifty-three years, retiring about 
seven years ago to make his home in Wollaston. 

In the course of his long service as a member of this Society, 
Mr. Sander received many awards, including four gold medals 
for groups and collections of Azaleas, a gold medal for a 
display at Holm Lea, a gold medal for Eminent Service in 
Horticulture and the Jackson Dawson Memorial medal for 
his work with woody plants. Notes for this brief obituary 
were supplied by Mr. W. N. Craig of Weymouth. 



Books the Gardener Should Know* 

Whether we think in terms of flower pots on the window 
sill or of acres in the country, all gardeners have problems. 
We cannot all live next door to an expert, but no matter how 
simple or how complicated our difficulties, there are helps in 
print available. In fact, there are so many good books that it 
is difficult to choose from among them. 

Among those of the last year or two, "Gardening, a Com- 
plete Guide to Garden Making," by Montague Free stands 
high. As its title suggests, it is a straightforward, practical 
work, planned for the amateur and packed with the things he 
wants to know. Its author is the horticulturist of the Brooklyn 
Botanic Garden, New York, a position which assures us that 
he is at the top of his profession. 

Not long ago a very interesting experiment in book mak- 
ing was tried. The late Mr. Leonard Barron, who was at the 
time garden editor for a well known publishing house, invited a 
group of experts to contribute chapters to a book for beginners 
called "The Complete Book of Gardening." One might expect 
that from experts we would get technicality or, on the other 
hand, that being for beginners, the product would be thin. 
On the contrary, each problem is reduced to its essentials and 
presented simply, and we have an informative book, really 
useful to beginners. 

The name of Alfred C. Hottes is another which knowing 
gardeners follow confidently. His contributions include a 
series of five small volumes, "The Book of Annuals," "The 
Book of Perennials," "The Little Book of Climbing Plants," 
"The Book of Shrubs," and "The Book of Trees." They have 
all stood the tests of time and use under a great variety of 
conditions. 

"The Plant Doctor" by Cynthia Westcott lives up to its 
name. It deals capably with bugs, diseases, and the constantly 
evolving technique of controlling them, is backed by knowl- 
edge and training, and is simple and non-technical without 
being written down to the amateur. There is even a spright- 
liness in its style that makes reading pleasant. 

Those who have read Stuart Chase's "Rich Land — Poor 
Land" must have a vivid impression of the diversity of soils 
and climate of our continent. Imagine the difficulties of writ- 

*A radio broadcast by Miss Dorothy S. Manks, Librarian, over Station 
W1XAL, Boston, Mass., April 19, 1938. 

29 



30 MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

ing for American gardens. The usual garden book is frankly 
regional in application. 

This Spring the ail-American problem has been approached 
from another side. Since nation-wide gardening experience is 
next to impossible to one individual, why not collect the ex- 
perience of a number of people? That is just what has been 
done in "The Gardener's Omnibus." Under the editorship of 
E. I. Farrington. all articles appear over their authors' signa- 
tures and they include nationally known authorities as well as 
amateur enthusiasts from all parts of the country. In making 
his selections Mr. Farrington has put his emphasis on the 
"how" as well as the "what." on simplicity and conciseness, 
and on comprehensiveness. Most of the material appeared in 
Horticulture before being included in the book. 

The South and the Pacific coast can follow the English 
authors, but in the East we offer them only to those who know 
how to adapt them. Even so everyone who loves good books 
as well as plants should make their acquaintance for their 
wisdom and mellowness and delightful flavor. To mention 
only one from the long list, I can make no better choice than 
the late Gertrude Jekyll, the "grand old lady'' of English 
gardens, whose creative work is best known in "Colour 
Schemes for the Flower Border." Her many contributions to 
magazines were recently collected in "A Gardener's Testa- 
ment." Miss Jekyll wielded a vigorous and well-founded lead- 
ership over the older generation of gardeners. 

Everyone who gardens should know John C. Wister and his 
books. Mr. Wister is a Philadelphian, secretary of the Penn- 
sylvania Horticultural Society, director of the Arthur Hoyt 
Scott Horticultural Foundation, and an ardent grower of irises 
and daffodils, as well as an author. Let me introduce to you 
"Four Seasons in the Garden," which he presents "for all 
who love gardening; but its first purpose is to interest those 
who plan to beautify rather small grounds — to point out the 
many different plants that you, the reader, may enjoy during 
the different seasons of the year— to make you realize that 
your garden is really much larger than you think. I believe 
(he says) it was Mrs. Schuyler Van Rensselaer who many 
years ago suggested that the land belonged to its owner but the 
landscape belonged, for the moment, to that person who looked 
at it and enjoyed it." 



BOOKS THE GARDENER SHOULD KNOW 31 

At the present tune I belong among the window-sill g 
deners. My problems are just as many and just as pressing as 
those of the owner of acres, though small jo scale. There is 
no single volume that meets my needs; sometimes I hunt 
through many to find out what I want to know. But tl 
happens only occasionally. Among the books on house plants 
a few are constantly referred to. "House Plants, Modern Care 
and Culture" by Marjorie Norrell Bulzer is divided into two 
parts, "general treatment for house plants" and "specific cul- 
ture of individual house plants." Not the least attractive 
feature is its generous supply of drawings. It is over so much 
easier to make a specified kind of cutting, for instance, from 
a picture than from printed directions. 

"The Window Garden" by Bessie Raymond Buxton is my 
second standby. No other book of my acquaintance approaches 
it on begonias arid geraniums. I happen to know that they are 
both hobbies of Mrs. Buxton's arid that what she writes about 
them is based on personal experience and on careful study. 

One of the questions most often asked me is "What is the 
best garden dictionary?" 1 often recommend "The Home 
Gardener's Pronouncing Dictionary" edited by A. C. Hottes. 
It is small and compact, gives pronunciations, definitions, 
common and botanical names, and prefaces the dictionary 
proper by an intriguing little essay on how plant names 
evolved. If you do not believe there is any interest for you in 
that subject, read what he has to say, or better yet, get Lib- 
erty Hyde Bailey's little volume entitled "How Plants Get 
Their Names." 

But to get back to dictionaries — for something more ex- 
haustive; than the little one by Hottes, you have your choice 
of "The Garden Dictionary" edited by Norman Taylor and 
the "Garden Encyclopedia" edited by E. L. D. Seymour. Both 
are one- volume affairs of substantial size and equal excellence. 

There are two ways of thinking of plants — as objects with 
which to beautify our gardens, and as living things. I wish the 
reading of Salisbury's "The Living Garden" could be made a 
required course for every gardener beyond the primary class, 
with Asa Gray's good old classic, "How Plants Grow" and 
Coulter's "Story of the Plant Kingdom" as an introduction. 
"The Living Garden" is one of the really original contribu- 
tions of the last few years. The author summarizes his work — 



32 MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

"We have in these pages taken together a journey of the mind 
through our gardens and seen something of the pageant of the 
seasons and the vicissitudes of the individual plants as part 
of a never-ceasing adjustment both to the conditions that 
nature provides and those that we ourselves impose. If we 
have rightly apprehended the plants we tend, as living organ- 
isms, we cannot fail to find the processes of nature as signi- 
ficant and fascinating as the results they achieve. We shall 
learn also to appreciate something of the unity around; for 
the more we prize and understand our gardens, the more we 
shall appreciate and treasure the beauties of nature uncon- 
trolled. Each supplements the other and to understand either 
we must contemplate both." 

No spot in the library fascinates me more than the maga- 
zine rack. The gay covers, the variety of themes, the attrac- 
tive presentation in picture and text never fail in their appeal. 

And nursery catalogues. You are surprised that I include 
catalogues? But, I ask, what gardener can get along without 
them? I know any number who keep their favorites as handy as 
the hose and the weeder. If you have not yet discovered them, 
I advise you to sit down with any garden magazine and half a 
dozen post cards, make a selection, and see what the mail 
brings back to you. A well written catalogue is a mine of in- 
formation. Nowhere else, for instance, even in the most ex- 
pensive books, will you find so many illustrations as in the 
catalogues of some of the larger firms. You will also be kept 
up to date on sprays and dusts, to say nothing of new tools, 
and more often than not the descriptions of the plants will be 
accompanied by advice on where to plant them and how to 
grow them. Yes indeed, the humble seed catalogue is to be 
treated respectfully. Our library receives several hundred a 
year, from all over the world. While I am not suggesting that 
anyone else go in for them on that scale, I assure you that if 
you do not get a few and study them, you are missing some- 
thing worthwhile. 

The government receives so much criticism of late, I wonder 
how many of us realize what a fine job it is doing for gar- 
deners. Research is a learned, forbidding word, but its results 
come down to common level more times than we realize. Do 
you, for example, have trouble keeping the pots of your house 
plants from drying out? Massachusetts State College has 



BOOKS THE GARDENER SHOULD KNOW 33 

found out that in our hot, dry rooms a porous clay pot is a 
mistake and advises us to use nonporous containers. 

For years most of the standard spray preparations have 
been based on arsenate of lead, and paris green has been used 
with equal freedom. Within the last year or two these have 
been replaced by pyrethrum and derris, which are harmless to 
warm-blooded creatures but fatal to the cold-blooded, includ- 
ing insects. This revolutionizes pest control, especially on 
fruits and vegetables, where a poisonous residue is dangerous. 
For this, too, we have government research to thank. 

How does one find out about these developments? It is very 
easy. Bulletins are published in great numbers and on an end- 
less variety of subjects, by the United States Department of 
Agriculture and the experiment station of each state. They 
are written by men who know; they are interesting, and they 
are available upon application to the offices that publish them. 
The thinnest pocketbook need not deprive anyone of a good 
garden library, and the best library in the country is behind 
the times without them. 

Garden books, however, are not all severely practical. 
Whether or not you are among the thousands who visit the 
Arnold Arboretum at Boston year by year, you should read 
"America's Greatest Garden" by Ernest H. Wilson, who did 
so much to make it so. You should discover the wit of Richard- 
son Wright in "Winter Diversions of a Gardener" and enlarge 
with the late Louise Beebe Wilder your knowledge of plants 
and what can be done with them to make garden pictures. 

Under the leadership of Donald Culross Peattie you should 
learn of the accomplishments of the great pioneer plantsmen. 
Perhaps you already know "Green Laurels." Then get his 
earlier volume, "Cargoes and Harvests," in which, among 
other things, you will learn that the voyage of Captain Bligh 
in the Bounty was really a plant hunting expedition. 

With Peattie's smooth prose goes quite naturally Sylvia 
Spencer's anthology "Up From the Earth," in which some of 
the great nature verse of three thousand years is collected. 

One could go on much longer without exhausting the possi- 
bilities of the subject. The most satisfactory way is to obtain 
a volume or two and see for yourself what a wealth of infor- 
mation and pleasure garden books have to offer. 



EXHIBITIONS 

in1938 
mechanics building 

March 17-23. Spring Exhibition. 

HORTICULTURAL HALL 

April 28 andf29. Daffodil Show. 
May 17 and 18. Tulip Show. 
June 16 and 17. June Exhibition. 

Thursday, 2 to 9 P.M. 
Friday, 9 A.M. to 9 P.M. 

August 17 and 18. Gladiolus Exhibition. New England 
Gladiolus Society. 

Wednesday, 2 to 9 P.M. 
Thursday, 9 A.M. to 9 P.M. 

August 25 and 26. Exhibition of the Products of Chil- 
dren's Gardens. 

Thursday, 1 to 6 P.M. 
Friday, 1 to 6 P.M. 

September 10 and 11. Dahlia Exhibition. Dahlia Society 
of New England. 

Saturday, 2 to 9 P.M. 
Sunday, 1 to 9 P.M. 

October 5-7. Fruit, Flower and Vegetable Exhibition. 

Wednesday, 2 to 9 P.M. 

Thursday and Friday, 9 A.M. to 9 P.M. 

November 10-13. Autumn Exhibition. 

Thursday, 2 to 10 P.M. 
Friday, 1 to 10 P.M. 
Saturday, 9 A.M. to 10 P.M. 
Sunday, 1 to 10 P.M. 

34 



EXHIBITS 

at the 

Spring Flower Show 

held at 

MECHANICS BUILDING 

March 17-23, 1938 




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Library Accessions 

New books added to the library during the year 1937 include 
the following: — 

American Delphinium Society. Delphinium, the book of the American 

delphinium society for 1936; ed. by L. H. Leonian, 1937. 
Anderson, E. The species problem in Iris, (reprint from Missouri 

Botanic Garden Annals, vol. 23, Sept. 1936, p. 457-509). 
Architectural Record. Restoration of Colonial Williamsburg in Virginia. 

Issue of Architectural Record for Dec. 1935. 
Armitage, E. A country garden. 1936. 
Arms, J. T. Design in flower arrangement. 1937. 
Auchter, E. C. and Knapp, H. B. Orchard and small fruit culture; ed. 

3. 1937. 
Badger, Mrs. C. M. Wild flowers drawn and colored from nature. 1859. 
Bailey, L. H. The garden of gourds. 1937. 
Bailey. W. W. Among Rhode Island wild flowers; 2d ed. 1896. 
Baker, R. S. The countrjmian's year, by David Grayson (pseud.) 1936. 
Ball, G. J. Ball red book, cultural notes "flower seeds for florists"; 

2d ed. 1933. 
Ball, G. J. Ball red book, notes on "flower seeds for florists"; 3d. ed. 

1935. 
Bates, A. Gardener's second year, perennials and bulbs. 1937. 
Bergmans, J. De tuin bij het huis. 1936. 

Betin, P. Le fidelle Iardinier ou differantes sortes de parterres. 1636. 
Bois. D. Les plantes alimentaires. tome 4 — Plantes a boissons. 1937. 
Bois, D. Les plantes d'appartement et les plantes de fenetres; 3e ed. 

1936. 
Bolus, H. M. L. Second book of South African flowers. 1936. 
Bosse, J. F. W. Die neuesten Zierpflanzen. welche in den letzten fiinf 

Jahren eingefuhrt sind und grossentheils schon in deutschen Garten 

cultiviert werden. 1854. 
Bouchot, H. The book, its printers, illustrators and binders from 

Gutenberg to the present time; ed. by H. Grevel. 1890. 
Britton, X. L. and Rose, J. X. The cactaceae. 4 vols. (Reprint 1931- 

1937). 
Brooklyn Botanic Garden. Botanic gardens of the world. 1937. 
Bunyard, E. A. Old garden roses. 1936. 
Butler, H. D. The family aquarium. 1858. 
Chase, S. Rich land, poor land. 1936. 
Chronica botanica, vol. 3. 1937. 

Ciesla, J. Decorating gourds for pleasure and profit. 1937. 
Clay, S. Present-da}* rock garden. 1937. 
Clinton-Baker, H. and Jackson. A. B. Illustrations of new conifers. 

1935. 

45 



46 MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

Collingwood, G. H. Knowing your trees. 1937. 

Correvon, H. Floraire, genese et developpement d'un jardin seculaire. 

1936. 
Coulter, M. C. Story of the plant kingdom. 1935. 
Cushing, L. S. Cushing's manual of parliamentary practice . . . new 

ed.; ed. and enlarged by A. S. Bolles. 1928. 
Darlington, H. R. Roses. 1911. 

Davis, H. B. Life and work of Cyrus Guernsey Pringle. 1936. 
De Fries, A. The book of the mushroom. 1936. 
Dickinson, L. S. The lawn; 2d ed. 1931. 
Dodoens, R. Histoire des plantes en laquelle est contenue la description 

entiere des herbes . . . 1557. 
Dorrance, A. Fragrance in the garden. 1937. 
Eberlein, H. D. and Hubbard, C. V. D. The practical book of garden 

structure and design. 1937. 
Emery, H. La vie vegetale: histoire des plantes a 1 'usage des gens du 

monde. 1878. 
Etnier, E. On Gilbert Head, Maine days. 1937. 
Fouquier, M. and Duchene, A. Des divers styles de jardins. 1914. 
Free, M. Gardening, a complete guide to garden making. 1937. 
Friend, H. Flowers and flower lore; 2d ed. 1884. 
Gardens and gardening. Studio annual, 1937. 
Gibbs, R. W. Gardens through the ages; ed. 2. 1937. 
Gilbert-Carter, H. British trees and shrubs. 1937. 
Gilkey, H. M. Handbook of northwest flowering plants. 1936. 
Goldsmith, M. 0. Friday-to-Monday gardening. 1937. 
Grey, C. Hardy bulbs, vol. 1, Iridaceae. 1937. 
Griffith, M. S. Gardening on nothing a year. 1937. 
Griswold, G. H. Common insects of the flower garden. 1937. 
Gropius, W. The new architecture and the Bauhaus. 1936. 
Guillaumin, A. Les fleurs de jardins, tome 4. 1936. 
Hadfield, M., ed. The gardener's companion. 1936. 
Harding, A. R. Ginseng and other medicinal plants; rev. ed. 1908. 
Hay, R. Annuals. 1937. 

Heald, F. D. Introduction to plant pathology. 1937. 
Hill, A. F. Economic botany. 1937. 
Hobbs, E. How to make garden structures. 1937. 
Hoehne, F. C. Album de orchidaceas Brasileiras eo orchidario do 

estado de S. Paulo. 1930. 
Holden, A. and Dutton, R. French chateaux open to the public. 1936. 
Holman, R. M. and Robbins, W. W. Textbook of general botany for 

colleges and universities; 3d ed. 1934. 
Hottes, A. C. Book of annuals; ed. 4 rev. 1937. 
Hottes, A. C. Book of perennials; ed. 5 rev. 1937. 
Hottes, A. C. Book of shrubs; ed. 3 rev. 1937. 



LIBRARY ACCESSIONS 47 

Hottes, A. C, comp. 1001 Christinas facts and fancies. 1937. 

Jarvis. C. D. American varieties of beans. 1908. 

Jekyll, G. and Hussey, C. Garden ornament; 2d ed. rev. 1927. 

Jekyll, G. A gardener's testament : a selection of articles and notes by 

G. Jekyll; ed. by F. Jekyll and G. C. Taylor. 1937. 
Jellicoe, G. A. Gardens of Europe. 1937. 
Jenkins, D. H. Vines for even- garden. 1937. 

Johnny Appleseed Memorial Commission. Johnny Appleseed. 1936. 
Johnson. A. T. A woodland garden. 1937. 

Kache. P. Die Praxis des Samenbaues der Bliitenpflanzen. 1933. 
Kains. M. G. Adventures in gardening for boys and girls. 1937. 
Kobel, F. Die Kirschensorten der deutschen Schweiz. 1937. 
Latimer. J. A. Inside my garden gate; rev. ed. 1935. 
Lincoln. E. H. Wild flowers of Xew England, volumes 5. 6. and 7. 

1937. 
Linnaeus. C. Species plantarum. (Facsimile reprint of ed. of 1753 

1934. 
Lyon. T. L. and Buckman, H. 0. Nature and properties of soils; 3d 

ed. 1937. 
McDougall. W. B. Fieldbook of Illinois wild flowers. 1936. 
McKenny, M. and Seymour. E. L. D. Your city garden. 1937. 
Macoun. J. Autobiography of John Macoun, Canadian explorer and 

naturalist 1831-1920. 1922. 
Macself, A. J. The chrysanthemum grower's treasury; ed. 3. 1935. 
Making, F. K. Identification of trees and shrubs. 1936. 
Mansfield, L. An artist's herbal. 1937. 

Marret, L. Icones florae alpinae plantarum. series 1-3. 1911-1924. 
Marzell, Dr. H., ed. Worterbueh der deutschen Pflanzennamen. Liefer- 

ung 1 und 2. 1937. 
Matschat, C. H. Annuals and perennials. 1937. 
Matschat. C. H. Bulbs and house plants. 1937. 
Matschat, C. H. How to make a garden. 1937. 
Matschat, C. H. Planning the home grounds. 1937. 
Matschat. C. H. Shrubs and trees. 1937. 
Meehan. T. Wayside flowers. 1881. 
Meisse. B. S. Modernistic flower arranging. 1937. 
Michigan Univ., Nichols Arboretum. Trees and shrubs hardy in southern 

Michigan and surrounding territory. 1937. 
Miller. H. F. R. An introduction to the genus Sempeiwivum. (From 

Alpine Garden Society Bulletin Dec. 1935.) 
Miiller, A. Portraits of dogwoods. 1937. 
Myers, E. F. Gardening in Virginia. 1936. 
National Research Council. Handbook of scientific and technical 

societies and institutions of the L'nited States and Canada; 3d ed. 

1937. 



48 MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

Nichols, G. E. Influence of exposure to winter temperatures upon seed 

germination in various native American plants. (From Ecology, 

Oct. 1934.) 
Nicolas, J. H. A rose odyssey: reminiscences of many trips to European 

rose centers. 1937. 
Nissley, C. H. Starting early vegetable and flowering plants under 

glass; rev. ed. 1937. 
Norton, J., & Sons. John Norton and sons, Merchants of London and 

Virginia; ed. by F. Norton Mason. 1937. 
Nylander, O. O. Orchids of northern Maine. 1937. 
d'Orta, G. Aromatvm, et simplicivm aliqvot medicamentorvm apvd 

indos nascentivm historia; 4 ed. 1593. 
Palladin, V. I. Palladin's plant physiology; ed. by B. E. Livingston. 

1926. 
Pammel, L. H. and King, C. M. Honey plants of Iowa. 1930. 
Pammel, L. H. The weed flora of Iowa. 1913. 

Parker, C. W. The lawn, how to make it and how to maintain it. 1937. 
Patterson, C. F. Hardy fruits, with special reference to their culture 

in western Canada. 1936. 
Pean, P. Jardins de France. 1925. 
Peattie, D. C. Cargoes and harvests. 1926. 

Pillsbury, A. C. Picturing miracles of plant and animal life. 1937. 
Pond, B. W. Outline history of landscape architecture, parts 1 and 2. 

1936. 
Preece, W. H. A. North American rock plants, series 1. 1937. 
Prince, Wm. Annual catalogue of esculent vegetable and other seeds. 

1833. 
Pyle, R. and McFarland, J. H. How to grow roses; ed. 18. 1937. 
Quinn, V. Leaves, their place in life and legend. 1937. 
Ransome, H. M. The sacred bee in ancient times and folklore. 1937. 
Rasmussen, S. E. London, the unique city, English rev. ed. 1937. 
Rhagor, D. Pflanz-Gart darinn grundtlicher Bericht zu linden . . . 

1. Obst-garten, 2. Kraut-garten, 3. Wein-garten. 1650. 
Robinson, W. Gravetye Manor, or twenty years' work round an old 

manor house 1885-1908. 1911. 
Royal Horticultural Society. Classified list of daffodil names. 1937. 
Royal Horticultural Society. Lily yearbook, 1936. 
Saint-Sauveur, H. Les beaux jardins de France. 1926. 
Sampaio, A. J. de. Nomes vulgares de plantas da Amazonia. (Boletim 

do museu nacional, Rio de Janeiro, vol. X, 1934.) 
Sander & Co. Addenda to Sander's list of orchid hybrids, 1934-1935- 

1936. 1937. 
Sanford, S. N. F. New England herbs, their preparation and use. 1937. 
San Francisco Museum of Art. Contemporary landscape architecture 

and its sources. 1937. 



LIBRARY ACCESSIONS 49 

Savage, S. The Hortus Floridus of Crispijn vande Pas the younger. 

(Bibliographical Society Transactions vol. 4, no. 3.) 1923. 
Schaffner, J. H. Field manual of trees; ed. 4. 1936. 
Schumann, K. and Guerke, M. Bliihende Kakteen. 1900. 
Scribner, F. L. The ornamental and useful plants of Maine. 1875. 
Sears, P. B. Deserts on the march. 1935. 
Shaw, E. E. Garden flowers of autumn. 1917. 
Shaw, E. E. Garden flowers of spring. 1917. 
Shaw, E. E. Garden flowers of summer. 1917. 

Sheckell, T. O. Trees, a pictorial volume for lovers of nature. 1936. 
Sherlock, C. C. Vegetable gardener's how book. 1937. 
Spender, R. E. S. and Pesel, L. F. Iris culture for amateurs. 1937. 
Stone, W. The plants of southern New Jersey. 1911. 
Strasburger, E. Das botanische Praktikum : Anleitung zum Selbstudium 

der mikroskopischen Botanik . . . 7te aufl. bearb. von Dr. Max 

Koernicke. 1923. 
Stuart, W. The potato; ed. 4. 1937. 

Sudell, R., ed. New illustrated gardening encyclopedia; new ed. 1937. 
Sutton and Sons. Culture of vegetables and flowers from seeds and 

roots; 19th ed. 1937. 
Sweet, R. Hortus Britannicus. 1826-1827. 
Symons-Jeune, B. H. B. Natural rock gardening; ed. 2. 1936. 
Tabernaemontanus, J. T. Eicones plantarum. 1590. 
Taylor, A. D. Camp stoves and fireplaces. 1937. 
Taylor, H. L. Mexican herb doctors. (Coronet, Dec. 1936) 
Teale, E. W. Grassroot jungles: a book of insects. 1937. 
Texas Forest Service. Forest trees of Texas. 1937. 
Togo, A. Japanese touch to American bouquet. 1935. 
Trovillion, V. and H. W. The sundial in our garden. 1935. 
True, A. C. A history of agricultural experimentation and research in 

the United States, 1607-1925; including a history of the United 

States Department of Agriculture. 1937. 
Vacherot, J. Pares et jardins. 1925. 
Vick's floral guide for 1874. 
Vvedensky, A. I. Species of wild flowers of the USSR: descriptive 

catalogue of bulbs and roots. 1935. 
Wagner, P. M. Wine grapes, their selection, cultivation and enjoyment. 

1937. 
Ward, F. K. Plant hunter's paradise. 1937. 
Weed, C. M. and Emerson, A. I. Our trees; ed. 5. 1918. 
Weir, W. W. Soil science. 1936. 

Wells, E. S. The beginnings of fruit culture in Connecticut. 1936. 
Went, F. W. and Thimann, K. V. Phytohormones. 1937. 
Westcott, C. The plant doctor. 1937. 
Wheelwright, E. G. Greenhouse culture for amateurs. 1937. 



50 MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

Wherry, E. T. Guide to eastern ferns. 1937. 

White, A. and Sloan, B. L. The Stapelieae; ed. 2. 3 vols. 1937. 

Wilder, Mrs. L. B. The garden in color. 1937. 

Willcox, O. W. The A B C of agrobiology. 1937. 

Winter, J. M. Analysis of flowering plants of Nebraska. 1936. 

Wuestenhoff, D. J. M. and Beerhorst, R. H. De Narcis. 1908. 



Gifts to the Library 

The Massachusetts Horticultural Society acknowledges with 
thanks gifts to the library from the following donors in 1937: 

Anderson, E. 

The species problem in iris, by E. Anderson, (reprint from Missouri 
Botanic Garden Annals, vol. 23, Sept. 1936, p. 457-509) 

Ball, G. J. 

Ball red book, cultural notes "flower seeds for florists"; 2d ed, by 

G. J. Ball. 1933. 
Ball red book, notes on "flower seeds for florists"; 3d ed., by G. J. 

Ball. 1935. 

Blossom, Miss Elizabeth T. 

Palladin's plant physiology, by V. I. Palladin; ed. by B. E. Living- 
ston. 1926. 

Bois, D. 

Les plantes alimentaires, tome 4 — Plantes a boissons, par D. Bois. 
1937. 

Brigham, Miss Margaret 

Wild flowers drawn and colored from nature by Mrs. C. M. Badger. 
1859. 
Buxton, Mrs. H. H. 

The window garden, by B. R. Buxton. 1936. 
Child, Miss Ruth 

Eicones plantarum, by J. T. Tabernaemontanus. 1590. 

Costa, Dr. F. 

Album de orchidaceas Brasileiras eo orchidario do estado de S. 
Paulo, por F. C. Hoehne. 1930. 

Crosby, Mrs. S. V. R. 

Orchids of northern Maine, by O. O. Nylander. 1937. 

Crouse, Mrs. E. S. 

338 volumes from the library of William J. Stewart, not itemized 
in the accessions list. 



GIFTS TO THE LIBRARY 51 

Durchanek, L. W. 

Das botanische Praktikum: Anleitung zum Selbstudium der mik- 
roskopichen Botanik, von E. Strasburger. 7te aufl. bearb. von Dr., 
Max Koernicke. 1923. 
Farrington, E. I. 

The chrysanthemum, by A. Herrington. 1905. 

Howard, Miss Gladys 

My garden. Aug. 1936-Sept. 1937. 

Latimer, Mrs. J. A. 

Inside my garden gate; rev. ed. by J. A. Latimer. 1935. 

Roulston, Miss Ethel 

Vick's floral guide for 1874. 

Ross, H. S. 

Histoire des plantes en laquelle est contenue la description entiere 
des herbes . . . par R. Dodoens. 1557. 

Spingarn, J. E. 

Large-fllowered clematis hybrids, by J. E. Spingarn. (From National 
Horticultural Magazine, Jan. 1935.) 

Tillinghast, Miss Helen M. 

First gourd book, by H. M. Tillinghast. 1937. 

Woodbury, Miss Mary 

The family aquarium, by H. D. Butler. 1858. 
Mosses and lichens, by N. L. Marshall. 1907. 



Periodicals Received, 1937 

* Library keeps only the current year on file. 

*Agricultura y Ganaderia. 

Agricultural Gazette of New South Wales. 

Agricultural Index. 

Alpine Garden Society. Bulletin. 

Alpine Garden Society. Year Book. 

American Amaryllis Society, Year Book. 
♦American Bee Journal. 

American Begonia Society. Bulletin. 

American Botanist. 

American Carnation Society. Proceedings. 

American Daffodil Yearbook. 

American Dahlia Society. Bulletin. 

American Delphinium Society. Year Book. 

American Fern Journal. 

American Forests. 

American Fruit Grower Magazine. 

American Home. 

American Iris Society. Bulletin. 

American Nurseryman. 

American Orchid Society. Bulletin. 

American Peony Society. Bulletin. 

American Rose Annual. 

American Rose Magazine. 

American Society for Horticultural Science. Proceedings. 

American Society of Landscape Architects. Bimonthly Index. 

Les Amis des Roses. 
* Aquatic Life. 

Arnold Arboretum. Bulletin of Popular Information. 

Arnold Arboretum. Journal. 

Australian Orchid Review. 

Better Fruit. 

Better Homes and Gardens. 

Blumen- und Pflanzenbau. 

Boyce Thompson Institute for Plant Research. Contributions. 

Boyce Thompson Institute for Plant Research. Professional Paper. 

Breeze Hill News. 

British Gladiolus Society. Gladiolus Annual. 

Brooklyn Botanic Garden. Record. 

Cactus and Succulent Society of America. Journal. 

Cactus and Succulent Society of Great Britain. Cactus Journal. 
*Calavo News. 

California Avocado Association. Yearbook. 

California. Department of Agriculture. Bulletin. 

52 



PERIODICALS RECEIVED, 1937 53 

California Garden. 

Canadian Florist. 

Canadian Gladiolus Society. Quarterly. 

Canadian Horticulture. 

Le Chrysantheme. 

Chrysanthemum Society of America. Bulletin. 

City Gardens Club (New York). Bulletin. 

Curtis's Botanical Magazine. 

Desert Plant Life. 

Elisha Mitchell Scientific Society. Journal. 

Experiment Station Record. 

F. T. D. News. 
*Farm Research. 

Federated Garden Clubs of Iowa. Iowa Gardens. 

Field Museum of Natural History. Botany Leaflet Series. 

Field Museum of Natural History. Publications. Botanical Series. 
*Field Museum of Natural History. Publications. Report Series. 
*Fertilizer Review. 

Florists' Exchange. 

Florists' Review. 

Flower Grower. 

Flowering Plants of South Africa. 

Forest Leaves. 
*Forestry News Digest. 

Four Seasons. 

Fruit World of Australasia. 

Garden Club Exchange. 

Garden Club Federation of Massachusetts. Yearbook. 

Garden Club of America. Bulletin. 

Garden Club of Kentucky. Yearbook. 

Garden Club of North Carolina. Yearbook. 

Garden Design. 

Garden Digest. 

Garden Gate. 

Garden Glories. 

Garden Gossip. 

Garden Life. 

Garden Lover. 

Garden Path. 

Gardeners' Chronicle. 

Gardeners' Chronicle of America. 

Gardening Illustrated. 

Gartenflora. 

Gartenkunst. 

Gartenschonheit. 



54 MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

Giardino Fiorito. 
Gladiolus Review. 
Golden Gardens. 
Gourd Bulletin. 

Gray Herbarium Contributions. 
Great Britain. Ministry of Agriculture. Journal. 

Hartford, Connecticut. Board of Park Commissioners. Annual Report. 
Harvard University. Botanical Museum. Leaflets. 
Herb Journal. 

Herb Society of America. The Herbarist. 
Hillcrest Gardens. 
Home Acres. 
*Home Gardening. 
Homes of the West. 
Hooker's Icones Plantarum. 
Hoosier Horticulture. 
L'Horticulteur Chalonnaise. 
Horticultural News. 

Horticultural Society of New York. Monthly Bulletin. 
Horticultural Society of New York. Yearbook. 
Horticultural Topics. 
Horticulture. 
L 'Horticulture Frangaise. 
House and Garden. 
House Beautiful. 
Illinois Horticulture. 

Illinois State Horticultural Society. Transactions. 
Illinois State Horticultural Society. News Letter. 
Indiana Horticultural Society. Transactions. 
International Horticulture. 
Iowa State Horticultural Society. Transactions. 
Ireland. Department of Lands and Agriculture. Journal. 
Iris Society (England). Yearbook. 
Japanese Horticultural Society. Journal. 
Jardinage. 

Jenkins Hemlock Arboretum. Bulletin. 
Journal of Agricultural Research. 
Journal of Botany, British and Foreign. 
Journal of Economic Entomology. 
Journal of Forestry. 

Journal of Pomology and Horticultural Science. 
Kew. Royal Gardens. Bulletin of Miscellaneous Information. 
Landscape and Garden. 
Landscape Architecture. 
Lexington Leaflets. 



PERIODICALS RECEIVED, 1937 55 

*Lingnan Science Journal. 

Linnaean Society. Journal. 

Little Gardens. 

Lloyd Library. Bulletin. 

Lyon-Horticole et Horticulture Nouvelle Reunis. 

Madison Cooper's Gardening Magazine. 

Market Growers Journal. 

Massachusetts Horticultural Society. Year Book. 

Massachusetts Trustees of Public Reservations. Annual Report. 

Michigan Academy of Science, Arts, and Letters. Papers. 

Mid West Dahlia News. 

Minnesota Horticulturist. 

Missouri Botanical Garden. Annals. 

Missouri Botanical Garden. Bulletin. 

Mollers Deutsche Gartner-Zeitung. 

Montreal. Universite. Laboratoire de Botanique. Contributions. 

Morton Arboretum. Bulletin of Popular Information. 

My Garden. 

National Auricula and Primula Society. Annual Report. 

National Carnation and Picotee Society (England). Annual Report 
and Yearbook. 

National Council of State Garden Club Federations. Bulletin. 

National Fertilizer Association. Proceedings. 

National Horticultural Magazine. 

National Nurseryman. 

National Rose Society (England). Rose Annual. 

National Shade Tree Conference. Proceedings. 
*Natur und Volk. 
*Nature-Garden Guide. 
*Nature Magazine. 

New England Gladiolus Society. Yearbook and Supplement. 
*New England Homestead. 

New Flora and Silva. 

New York Botanical Garden. Journal. 

North and South Dakota Horticulture. 

Northern Nut Growers Association. Annual Report. 

Northwest Gardens. 

Oklahoma Gardener. 

Ontario. Horticultural Societies. Annual Report. 
*Open Shelf. 

Orchid Review. 

Ortofrutticoltura Italiana. 
*Parks and Recreation. 

Pennsylvania Horticultural Society. Yearbook. 

Le Petit Jardin. 



56 MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

La Pomologie Francaise. 

Popular Gardening. 

Reale Societa Toscana di Orticultura. Bulletino. 
*Revista de Agricultura de Puerto Rico. 

Revue Horticole. 

Rhodora. 

Rio de Janeiro. Jardin Botanico. Archivos. 

Rio de Janiero. Museu Nacional. Boletim. 

Rodriguesia. 

Royal Horticultural Society. Daffodil Yearbook. 

Royal Horticultural Society. Journal. 

Royal Horticultural Society. Lily Yearbook. 

S. A. G. 

Scientific Horticulture. 

Scottish Forestry Journal. 

Seed Trade Buyers Guide. 

Seed Trade News. 

Seed World. 

Shade Tree. 

Smithsonian Institution. Annual Report. 
♦Societe d'Horticulture de la Haute-Garonne. Annales. 
♦Societe d'Horticulture d'Orleans et du Loiret. Bulletin. 
♦Societe d'Horticulture et de Viticulture d'Epernay. Bulletin. 

Societe Frangaise du Dahlia. Journal. 

Societe Nationale d'Horticulture de France. Bulletin. 

Societe Royale de Botanique de Belgique. Bulletin. 

Southern Florist and Nurseryman. 

Southern Home and Garden. 

Success With Roses. 
♦Sunset. 
♦Tennessee Horticulture. 

Torrey Botanical Club. Bulletin. 

Torrey Botanical Club. Memoirs. 

Toreya. 

Tribune Horticole. 

U. S. Department of Agriculture. Yearbook. 

Verbandsmitteilungen des Landesverbandes Sachsen fur Gartenbau. 

Verein Zum Schutze der Alpenflanzen. Jahrbuch. 
♦Victoria, Australia. Department of Agriculture. Journal. 
♦Waltham, Mass. Field Station. Vegetable Growers Journal. 

West Virginia Gardens. Yearbook. 

Wild Flower. 

Wisconsin Horticulture. 

Worcester County Horticultural Society. Transactions and Schedule. 

Your Garden and Home. 



Garden Clubs Not Members of 
the Massachusetts Federation 

Abington Garden Club. 
President, Mrs. W. S. O'Brien, 47 Brockton Ave., Abington. 
Secretary, Mrs. Henry E. Claflin, 1164 Washington St., No. Abington. 

Acton Garden Club. 
President, Mrs. Ernest Washburn, Acton. 
Secretary, Mrs. Joseph Fitzgibbons, Acton. 

Attleboro Garden Club. 
President, Mr. Leon W. Wagner, 23% Bank St., Attleboro. 
Secretary, Miss Mary L. Gay, 42 Church St., No. Attleboro. 

Bernardston Garden Club. 

President, Mrs. Raymond L. Dunnell, Bernardston. 

Secretary, Mrs. Roy Herrick, Bernardston. 
Better Homes Garden Club of Medford Hillside Mothers' Club. 

President, Mrs. F. W. Sleeper, 352 Boston Ave., Medford Hillside. 

Secretary, Mrs. C. C. Campbell, Dearborn St., Medford Hillside. 

Beverly, The Friendly Garden Club of. 
President, Mrs. Wendell Fessenden, 167 Essex St., Beverly. 
Secretary, Mrs. Herbert C. Norburg, 485 Elliott St., Beverly. 

Beverly Improvement Society. 
President, Miss Winifred P. Upton, 10 Highland Ave., Beverly. 
Secretary, Miss Mary Marston, 41 Essex St., Beverly. 

Bridgewater Garden Club. 

President, Mrs. Charles K. Nash, 241 South St., Bridgewater. 
Secretary, Mrs. Herman Daiker, Summer St., Bridgewater. 

Chartley Garden Club. 
President, Mrs. Earl P. Cooper, 1030 Pleasant St., Attleboro. 
Secretary, Mrs. Charles A. Jenks, R.D. 3, Box 139, Attleboro. 

Chelsea Woman's Club, Garden Club of the. 

Chairman, Mrs. Max E. Stewart, 35 Franklin St., Chelsea. 
Secretary, Mrs. Robert Huddell, 155 Garfield Ave., Chelsea. 

Clinton Woman's Club, Department of Gardens of the. 

Chairman, Mrs. A. D. Perham, 536 High St., Clinton. 

Secretary, Mrs. William Hopfmann, Clinton. 
Deerfield Garden Club. 

President, Mr. Charles Huntington Smith, Deerfield. 

Secretary, Mrs. Henry C. Wells, Deerfield. 

East Bridgewater Garden Club. 
President, Mrs. Marion Oakley, Pleasant St., East Bridgewater. 
Secretary, Miss Gladys M. Hennessy, 386 West Union St., East Bridge- 
water. 

57 



58 MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

East Milton Garden Club. 
President, Mrs. G. G. Swanson, Howard St., East Milton. 
Secretary, Mrs. Kenneth Johnson, Brackett St., East Milton. 

Easton, Garden Club of. 
President, Mrs. John C. Mason, 18 Day St., North Easton. 
Secretary, Mrs. Ralph Craig, 60 Elm St., North Easton. 

Endicott Garden Club. 
President, Mrs. Ruth Bestwick, Taylor Rd., Dedham. 
Secretary, Mrs. Clara Cobbett, Sprague St., Dedham. 

Foxboro Garden Club. 
President, Mrs. Benton P. Crocker, South St., Foxboro. 
Secretary, Miss Laura F. Taylor, 83 North St., Foxboro. 

Georgetown Woman's Club, Garden Department of. 

Chairman, Mrs. Irving Chesley, 138 Central St., Georgetown. 
Secretary, Mrs. Charles Legal, 146 Elm St., Georgetown. 

Hampden Garden Club. 
President, Mrs. Marion Wells Gerrish, Hampden. 
Secretary, Mr. Benjamin F. Libby, R.F.D. 1, East Longmeadow. 

Hampshire County Garden Club. 

President. Mr. Warren D. McAvoy, Village Hill Rd., Williamsburg. 
Secretary, Mrs. A. L. Judge, 169 Chestnut St., Northampton. 

Hanover Garden Club. 
President, Mrs. Benjamin F. Conant, East Pembroke. 
Secretary, Mrs. Gilbert Ordway, Hanover. 

Holden Garden Club. 
President, Mrs. Franklin Hubbard, Holden. 
Secretary, Mrs. Harry W. Holton, Holden. 

Holliston Garden Club. 
President, Mrs. R. T. Wells, Concord St., Holliston. 
Secretary, Mrs. William DollorT, Hollis St., Holliston. 

Hopedale Woman's Club, Garden Department of. 
Chairman, Mrs. Albert H. Woodhead, 26 Bancroft Pk., Hopedale. 
Secretary, Mrs. Harry A. Billings, 94 Dutcher St., Hopedale. 

Hopkinton Woman's Club, Garden Section of the. 
Secretary, Miss Nellie B. Johnson, Main St., Hopkinton. 

Hubbardston Continuation Club. 
President, Mrs. Anne Howard, Hubbardston. 
Secretary, Mrs. Jane Evans, Hubbardston. 

Hyde Park Garden Club. 
President, Mrs. Alfred W. Hoitt, 63 Child St., Hyde Park. 
Secretary, Mrs. Harold Stoltz, 33 Summit St., Hyde Park. 



GARDEN CLUBS NOT MEMBERS OF THE MASSACHUSETTS FEDERATION 59 

Mansfield New Century Club, Garden Department of the. 
Chairman, Mrs. Clara E. Giles, 172 North Main St., Mansfield. 
Secretary, Mrs. Gertrude Paine, Mansfield. 

Monson Garden Club. 
President, Mr. Henry C. Sanderson, Wilbraham Rd., Monson. 
Secretary, Mrs. Mary Louise Bradway, 3 Ely Ed., Monson. 

Nahant Garden Club. 
President, Mrs. George Dick, 20 Tudor Rd., Nahant. 
Secretary, Mrs. Fred L. Timmins, 6 Prospect St., Nahant. 

Needham, The Men's Garden Club of. 
President, Mr. J. Corwin Wright, 893 Webster St., Needham. 
Secretary, Mr. Henry F. Silsby, 459 High Rock St., Needham. 

Newton Upper Falls Garden Club. 
President, Mrs. Raymond Capobianco, 92 Thurston Rd., Newton 

Upper Falls. 
Secretary, Mrs. James Tully, 51 High St., Newton Upper Falls. 

Northampton Woman's Club, Garden Department of the. 
Chairman, Miss Kate R. Koch, Paradise Rd., Northampton. 
Secretary, Mrs. John C. Pickett, Harrison Ave., Northampton. 

North Attleboro Garden Club. 
President. Mr. A. J. Labadie, Rear 46 Orne St., North Attleboro. 
Secretary, Mr. Harry L. Dixon, 73 South St., Plainville. 

Oxford Garden Club. 
President, Mrs. William W. Taft, Box 312, Oxford. 
Secretary, Mrs. Maurice Healy, Oxford. 

Pelham Woman's Club, Garden Group of. 
Chairman, Mrs. Guy Reed, Pelham Rd., Amherst. 
Secretary, Mrs. Ida Hunt, R.F.D., Pelham. 

Pembroke-Hanson Garden Club. 
President, Mrs. Russell W. Broadbent, R.F.D., South Hanson. 
Secretary, Mrs. Arthur Bartlett, R.F.D., Kingston. 

Pepperell Garden Club. 
President, Mrs. Benjamin P. Poor, Townsend. 
Secretary, Mrs. George P. Parker, 15 Leighton St., East Pepperell. 

Pittsfield Garden Club. 
President, Mrs. F. P. Whitney, 457 William St., Pittsfield. 
Secretary, Miss Elizabeth M. Moore, 169 Elm St., Pittsfield. 

Rehoboth Garden Club. 
President, Mrs. James Lamont, Rehoboth. 
Secretary, Mrs. Frederick W. Moulson, Bay State Rd., Rehoboth. 



60 MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

Rockland Garden Club. 

President, Mrs. Robert Cannaway, North Hanover. 

Secretary, Mrs. Helena Hurley, Payson Ave., Rockland. 
Shelburne Falls Garden Club. 

President, Mr. Frank P. Davison, 54 Maple St., Shelburne Falls. 

Secretary, Mrs. Fred Shontag, 51 Prospect St., Shelburne Falls. 

Sohoanno Garden Club. 

President, Mrs. Edith C. Cook, Wrentham. 

Secretary, Mrs. H. C. Hagopian, Franklin St., Wrentham. 
Southborough Woman's Club, Garden Group of. 

Chairman, Mrs. George D. Parmenter, Fayville. 

Secretary, Mrs. Chester M. Bean, Box 52, Cordaville. 

South Warren Community Garden Club. 

President, Mrs. Kenneth Tuttle, R.F.D. 1, West Brookfield. 

Secretary, Mrs. D. Walker Cheney, R.F.D. , Brimfield. 
Spencer Garden Club. 

President, Mrs. Elsie Dickerman, 252 Main St., Spencer. 

Secretary, Mrs. Elsie Hitchings, Hillsville, Spencer. 

Stoneham Garden Club. 

President, Mrs. Martin Olson, 68 Montvale Ave., Stoneham. 
Secretary, Mrs. Ernest R. Grauman, 9 Broadway, Stoneham. 

Sunderland Woman's Club, Garden Section of. 
Chairman, Mrs. R. L. Dickinson, Sunderland. 
Secretary, Mrs. S. I. Childs, Sunderland. 

Swampscott Tuesday Garden Club. 
President, Mrs. Beatrice Linehan, 32 Fuller Ave., Swampscott. 
Secretary, Mrs. Leo J. Coughlin, 5 Essex Ter., Swampscott. 

Telephone Employees' Garden Club. 
President, Mr. Charles W. Anderson, 6 Bowdoin Sq., Boston. 
Secretary, Mr. Ulderic F. Hurley, 245 State St., Boston. 

Tewksbury Garden Club. 

President, Mrs. William A. Smith, Marshall St., Tewksbury. 
Secretary, Mrs. Alan D. Bockes, East St., Tewksbury. 

Ware Social Science Club, Garden Department of. 

Chairman, Mrs. John H. Schoonmaker, Church St., Ware. 
Secretary, Mrs. Bernard W. Southmouth, Church St., Ware. 

Wellesley, Men's Garden Club of. 
President, Mr. Freeman T. Putney, 49 Clovelly Rd., Wellesley Hills. 
Secretary, Mr. Robert G. Bolles, 56 Forest St., Wellesley Hills. 

West Boylston Garden Club. 

Chairman, Mrs. George Kenny, Sterling. 
Secretary, Mrs. Frank E. Adams, West Boylston. 



GARDEN CLUBS NOT MEMBERS OF THE MASSACHUSETTS FEDERATION 61 

West Dennis Garden Club. 
President, Mrs. C. Alton Crowell, South Dennis. 
Secretary, Mrs. Edward W. Vogel, West Dennis. 

West Newton Women's Educational Club, Garden Club of. 
Leader, Mrs. R. O. Littlefield, 25 Walnut PL, Newtonville. 
Secretary, Mrs. Gilbert R. Jones, Eddy St., West Newton. 

Westboro Garden Club. 

President, Miss Annie Fales, West Main St., Westboro. 

Secretary, Mrs. Richard Wilhite, Milk St., Westboro. 
Whitinsville Woman's Club Garden Group. 

Chairman, Mrs. Ernest P. Barnes, 15 Spring St., Whitinsville. 

Secretary, Mrs. Edward A. Ballard, Main St., Linwood. 

Whitman Men's Garden Club. 

President, Mr. Merle L. Averell, 815 Washington St., Whitman. 

Secretary, Mr. Gilbert H. Emery, 58 Vernon St., Whitman. 
Whitman Women's Garden Club. 

President, Mrs. Charles R. Conant, 696 Washington St., Whitman. 

Secretary, Mrs. Wallace Prouty, 38 Benson St., Whitman. 

Wilbraham Woman's Club, Garden Group of. 
Leader, Mrs. Harry L. Piper, Glendale Rd., North Wilbraham. 

Winchendon Garden Club. 

President, Mrs. George W. Gregory, 78 Spruce St., Winchendon. 

Secretary, Mrs. Donald MacMillan, 496 Central St., Winchendon. 
Woburn Woman's Club, The Garden Group of the. 

Chairman, Mrs. C. Fred Burdett, 605 Main St., Woburn. 

Secretary, Mrs. Edgar W. Preston, 13 Scott St., Woburn. 
Worcester, Hortulus Club of. 

President, Miss Mary E. O'Neil, 27 Oberlin St., Worcester. 

Secretary, Mrs. George A. Power, 3 Loudon St., Worcester. 



Life Members Not Located 

Mail has been returned from the following Life Members 
whom the secretary has been unable to locate: 

Mr. Frank F. Baldwin, 486 South Station, Boston, Mass. 

Mr. Walter S. Barnes, 789 A Tremont St., Boston, Mass. 

Mr. George N. Black, 10 Post Office Sq., Room 38, Boston, Mass. 

Mr. Francis Campbell, 42 Langdon St., Cambridge, Mass. 

Mr. Simon F. Cox, 249 River St., Mattapan, Mass. 

Mr. James Donaldson, 339 Washington St., Roxbury, Mass. 

Mr. Herbert H. Dyer, 7 Dana St., Cambridge, Mass. 

Mrs. Swinburne Hale, 8 East 8th St., New York City. 

(Mrs. Hale formerly Mrs. Marie T. Garland, Buzzards Bay) 
Mr. Jackson E. Hall, 423 Green St., Cambridge, Mass. 
Mr. Levi W. Hastings, Clyde St., Brookline, Mass. 
Mr. William W. Holt, Tujunga, California. 
The Hon. Mrs. Horace L. A. Hood, East Sheen Lodge, Sheen, Surrey, 

England 
Mr. John Jeffries, 5th, 1933 Spruce St., Philadelphia, Penna. 
Dr. Mary E. Jones, 8 James St., Boston, Mass. 
Mr. Simeon C. Keith, 138 Lancaster Terrace, Brookline, Mass. 
Mr. Joseph R. Kendall, No address. 
Mr. Amos A. Lawrence, Beaver Pond, Beverly, Mass. 
Mrs Joseph Millmore, 1713 Corcoran St., Washington, D. C. 
Mr. Charles W. Norton, Allston, Mass. 
Mr. John O'Conner, 139 Egmont St., Brookline, Mass. 
Mr. John C. Phillip, 77 Mt. Vernon St., Boston, Mass. 
Mr. Dean Pierce, 53 State St., Room 945, Boston, Mass. 
Miss Anna B. Roberts, Boston, Mass. 
Miss Dulcie L. Smith, 28 East 70th St., New York City. 
Mr. Earnest E. Smith, 85 Devonshire St., Boston, Mass. 
Mr. Charles S. Strout, Hunt Farm, North Whitefield, Maine 
Mr. Raymond W. Swett, Brawley, California, and Saxonville, Mass. 
Mrs. Marie Louise West, Dorchester, Mass. 



62 



Benevolent Fraternity Fruit and 
Flower Mission 

As the Benevolent Fraternity Fruit and Flower Mission 
enters upon its seventieth year of activity it is privileged to 
again express its grateful appreciation to the Trustees of the 
Massachusetts Horticultural Society for their continued co- 
operation and for the courteous and kindly interest of Mr. 
Farrington. 

Even the extreme heat of last Summer had but slight effect 
on the total number of hampers, boxes and baskets received 
from outlying towns, 705 against 718 in 1936. 

Outstanding among the garden clubs sending contributions 
of flowers, fruits and vegetables during the hamper season 
were Duxbury, Lexington, Wollaston and Newton Centre. 

The Lexington Field and Garden Club sent 63 Christmas 
wreaths, sprays with gifts, gay little red pots filled with greens 
and adorable apple Christmas trees with miniature trimmings. 

Six hundred and seventy-three jars of jelly, preserves and 
relish; 786 tins of canned goods; 351 packaged goods; 1851 
tea balls; 64 pounds of hard candy; were among the holiday 
donations to fill our 340 attractively trimmed baskets. 

The year has been a happy one. Our volunteer helpers have 
stood by loyally, eighteen assisting in the distribution after 
the Gladiolus Show on the hottest day of the Summer, with 
the thermometer reaching 98 degrees. 

The receipt of 15,000 to 18,000 beautiful carnations after 
the exhibit of the American Carnation Society in January was 
a high light and enabled us to supply many hospital wards 
and individual shut-ins. 

Through the thoughtfulness of two friends, 35 individuals, 
most of them elderly, were able to enjoy the Spring Flower 
Show. Except for this kindness they could not have attended. 
These men and women from Homes for the Aged or from 
lodging house rooms in congested sections of our city will 
treasure throughout the year the memory of this red letter day. 

Some one has said that many people living in single rooms 
have palatial minds. The Massachusetts Horticultural Society 
makes it possible for the Fruit and Flower Mission to cheer 
hundreds of such recipients. 

Emily I. Elliott, Executive Secretary 
63 



Necrology 



The following is a list of the members of the Massachusetts 
Horticultural Society whose deaths were reported during the 
year 1937: 



Mr. Gordon Abbott 
Mrs. H. G. Alley 
Mr. Peter Andersen 
Mr. Larz Anderson 
Mr. Robert M. Bailey 
Miss Abby Tilden Baker 
Mrs. R. H. Bancroft 
Mrs. Clifford Baylies 
Mr. Walter C. Baylies 
Miss Olive Mills Belches 
Mr. Charles O. Blood 
Mr. Eldredge H. Blood 
Mr. George V. Brown 
Mrs. J. Frank Brown 
Mr. Albert F. Buffum 
Mr. Laurence S. Caldwell 
Miss Maude E. Capron 
Mr. Theodore H. Castor 
Mr. John Challis 
Mrs. May L. Clarke 
Mr. Charles H. Cleaves 
Mr. Micajah Pratt Clough 
Miss Laura Coleman 
Mrs. Mary I. Courtenay 
Dr. Sarah M. Crawford 
Mrs. Herbert Damon 
Mr. Arthur P. Dana 
Miss Sarah L. Day 
Mr. Gordon Dexter 
Miss Emma M. Dinsmore 
Mr. William F. Dusseault 
Mr. Albert F. Earnshaw 
Mr. John M. Edmunds 
Mrs. H. S. Eldredge 
Miss F. Ethel Elliott 
Mrs. Alcott F. Elwell 
Mr. Frank L. Erskine 



Miss Elizabeth M. Eustis 
Miss C. T. Fitch 
Mrs. Alfred A. Fitz 
Miss Elizabeth H. Flint 
Mrs. Francis W. Forbes 
Mrs. Max Frankel 
Mr. W. Clifford French 
Mr. Herbert E. Gale 
Mrs. James Geddes 
Mr. Charles E. Gibson 
Mr. Herbert W. Gleason 
Mr. William N. Goddard 
Mrs. Gurdon W. Gordon 
Mr. T. J. Guinan 
Miss L. Louise Hetzer 
Miss Nora K. Holman 
Mr. F. W. Hubbard 
Mrs. Henry V. Hubbard 
Mr. H. Huebner 
Miss Belle Hunt 
Mr. Harry Hampton Hunt 
Mrs. Alice K. Hutchison 
Miss Lucina Jewell 
Mrs. Branton Kellogg 
Mrs. Charles A. Kidder 
Mrs. John Lawrence 
Mr. Robert Laurie 
Mr. James S. Lee 
Mr. E. L. Lewis 
Mrs. Edward Lovering 
Mr. Edward M. Mackey 
Mrs. Daniel L. Marsh 
The Rt. Hon. Sir Herbert E. Max- 
well, Bart., K.T., F.R.S., D.C.L. 
Mr. Michael J. McGuire 
Mr. Frank McMahan 
Mrs. Eva E. Moore 



64 



NECROLOGY 



65 



Mrs. Frances T. Norton 
Mrs. Charles J. O'Malley 
Mrs. Frank W. Parsons 
Mrs. Francis Peabody, Jr. 
Miss Adelaide F. Perkins 
Mr. George G. S. Perkins 
Miss Clara C. Prince 
Mr. Fred D. Rand 
Mrs. William R. Ransom 
Mr. Charles G. Reed 
Mr. Herbert A. Rhoades 
Miss Edith D. Rodgers 
Mrs. Frank Rumrill 
Mrs. George P. Sanger 
Mrs. J. A. Schweinfurth 
Mrs. Ellery Sedgwick 
Mrs. Rebecca M. Shove 
Mrs. William Simonds 
Mrs. James Newell Smith 
Mrs. William H. Smith 
Mrs. Isaac Sprague 



Mr. Pierpont L. Stackpole 

Mrs. James E. Stanton, Jr. 

Mr. A. L. Stephen 

Mrs. Samuel D. Stevens 

Mr. Claude L. Stott 

Mrs. Edward D. Thayer 

Mrs. Artemas L. Tyler 

Mrs. Harry Lincoln Wadsworth 

Miss Jean Walker 

Miss Mary Lee Ware 

Mr. Harry L. Watson 

Miss Eva 0. Wheeler 

Mrs. Charles C. Wheelwright 

Mrs. Howard Whitcomb 

Mr. H. M. Whitney 

Mr. George Percy Williams 

Mrs. Kate E. Wilson 

Mr. Edward F. Woods 

Mr. L. H. Worthley 

Mrs. Philip Young 



Death of the Oldest Member 



The Society's oldest member in point of years was Mr. Vin- 
cent Buitta, who passed away in March. Mr. Buitta became a 
member on October 8, 1906. He was a market gardener spe- 
cializing in unusual vegetables and often exhibited at Horti- 
cultural Hall. At one time he was a frequent visitor to the 
shows and was well known by many members. 




^11 



MASSACHUSETTS 
HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 



REPORTS 

OF THE 
OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES 



PRESENTED AT THE 
ANNUAL MEETING MAY 2, 1938 



WITH A LIST OF MEMBERS 
ADMITTED IN 1937 



Annual Meeting, 1938 

The annual meeting of the Massachusetts Horticultural So- 
ciety was held in Horticultural Hall at 3 P. M. on Monday, 
May 2, with the President, Mr. Edwin S. Webster, in the chair. 
The President announced that the polls would be open until 
6 o'clock and named Mr. William H. Judd, Joseph E. Davis 
and Allen W. Edminster to be tellers. The Secretary read the 
call for the meeting and the minutes of the previous annual 
meeting, after which the President made his address and re- 
ports were read by the Secretary, Treasurer and Committee 
Chairmen. 

The President's Address 

The Massachusetts Horticultural Society is now well along 
in its second century. It is difficult to realize that the cen- 
tennial year is fast fading into history, but the difference be- 
tween a membership of 5,652 and 9,044 indicates that sufficient 
time has elapsed for marked progress. That progress is not an 
accident, however. It is the result of a carefully thought out 
program and never ending effort. 

I am told that some of the older members have expressed 
themselves as wondering at the present size of the staff and 
the extent of their activities. Perhaps these people are thinking 
of the years not long gone when the Society's work was carried 
on by a Secretary and a Librarian with no assistants. At that 
time, there was only one typewriter in the building, and all 
correspondence was done with pen and ink, the records being 
kept in the same way. At that time, too, the membership was 
less than 1000. 

Even then, however, the Society was doing an excellent piece 
of work. Public lectures were being held, shows were being 
given and bulletins were being issued. Even more noteworthy, 
perhaps, was the encouragement given to the school garden 
movement, which was started in Boston at that period and 
later spread to all parts of the country. Much of the credit 
for this great movement must be given to this Society. 

The real upturn in the Society's affairs came, however, with 
the advent of the present era of gardening interest and en- 
thusiasm, both of which had existed for years but never to 
the degree which manifested itself when garden clubs came 
into being throughout the land. If the officers of this Society 

69 



70 MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

claim any credit for the progress which has been made, it is 
only in the fact that they have recognized the dawn of the new 
day and have endeavored to keep abreast of horticultural de- 
velopments all along the line. Our progress has been coincident 
with that of other Societies similar in character, but we are 
fortunate in having facilities much greater than those of any 
contemporary Society and thus are able to move ahead more 
rapidly, perhaps, and on a greater scale. 

I also understand that questions are being asked about the 
Spring Flower Show. It is only fair to answer these questions 
as far as possible. The Spring show in its present form was 
inaugurated after much consideration and long debate to keep 
the Society's receipts abreast of its expenditures. Its chief pro- 
ponents were Ernest H. Wilson and Thomas H. Roland, both 
of whom have since passed away. 

This show is expected by the Budget Committee to make a 
profit of $20,000. Sometimes it attains this figure; sometimes 
it falls far below it, as happened two years ago because of the 
floods. The Society carries its own insurance to meet such an 
emergency in the form of a show fund which has been built up 
from year to year until it now amounts to $36,200. If a show 
fails to reach the goal set for it, this fund can be drawn upon, 
and this has been done. Without the profit of the Spring show, 
the Summer and Fall shows could not be held. Without it, too, 
some of the other activities carried on would necessarily be 
curtailed. 

There is a general belief that this Society is very wealthy. 
I wish I could make every one understand that this is not true. 
There were many years before the last decade when the So- 
ciety usually found itself in the red. This seldom happens 
now, but only because of the business-like way in which it is 
conducted, and not because of increased endowments or a 
greater yield from investments. The fact is, of course, that the 
yield from investments has decreased because of the continued 
calling of bonds having a high rate of interest. Moreover, 
many of the Society's investments are so hedged about by the 
requirements of special funds that they can be utilized only in 
a limited way. No large bequests have been received for a 
long time, partly, without doubt, because of the wide-spread 
belief that the Society has all the money it needs. I hope this 
belief will be dispelled. 



ANNUAL MEETING, 1938 71 

The income from Mt. Auburn Cemetery, which the Society 
has received for almost a century, is growing less and will con- 
tinue to decrease with the lessening sale of lots. Furthermore, 
the income from rentals has been greatly curtailed. The com- 
petition of hotels and clubs has reduced the use of the hall for 
conventions, parties and dances. This condition is general 
throughout the city. 

Yet the Society has not become less prosperous because of 
these losses or because of its increased activities. Indeed, it is 
better off financially than when its membership was less than a 
thousand and its staff confined to two people. That is to say, 
it has paid its way throughout the period of its expansion. 
Even the membership dues have become an important factor, 
amounting to more than $16,000 a year. Yet an increasing 
membership would prove a liability if all the members took 
advantage of all the privileges offered them, for it is obvious 
that with a free admission to the shows and the lectures, the 
regular receipt of HORTICULTURE and the use of the li- 
brary, the annual fee of $2.00 is quickly consumed. I know of 
no other organization anywhere which gives as much for the 
money. An annual membership in Pennsylvania costs $3.00; 
in New York, $10.00. It costs $3.50 a year to belong to the 
Gardeners' and Florists' Club of Boston. 

However, I am not making a plea for higher dues. This is to 
all intents and purposes an educational and philanthropic 
institution. As such, we undertake to give just as much as we 
can and still keep within our income. We take pride in this. 
We take pride, too, in the co-operation and support which are 
given the officers and staff by the members at large. The many 
letters of appreciation which we receive provide a constant 
inspiration. 

We are proud of our splendid building, which has become 
one of the city's architectural landmarks, but I digress for a 
moment to express the hope that one important physical im- 
provement can be made. That is the construction of a marquee 
or canopy over the entrance, similar in type to the one which 
has been constructed along the side of Symphony Hall across 
the street, but smaller. Such a canopy would mark the en- 
trance to the building and provide a feeling of friendliness 
which is now absent. The building's somewhat cold exterior 
and its lack of invitation are drawbacks which I recommend 



72 MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

correcting as soon as the financial condition of the society 
makes this possible. 

Probably the most important action which has been taken 
by the Trustees the past year has been the revision of the By- 
Laws in the form offered to you for your consideration today. 
It had long been realized by the members of the Board that 
some action of this sort was needed. Various amendments 
had been made from time to time, but the fact was obvious 
that changes were required which would put the By-Laws 
more in keeping with present-day conditions. Accordingly, a 
committee was appointed to act with a qualified attorney in 
revising, simplifying and condensing the By-Laws under 
which the society has been operating since they were formu- 
lated under the direction of Mr. Burrage in 1930. 

Besides the president, the committee consisted of Mr. Win- 
throp Carter, who was made chairman, Mr. Walter Hunne- 
well, Mr. William Ellery, Mr. John S. Ames and Mr. Robert 
H. Roland. They have had the assistance and co-operation of 
the office staff and have spent no little time and thought on 
this revision. The thanks of the Society are due them for what 
they have accomplished. 

It speaks well for the Society, its standing and its prestige, 
that it is able to enlist busy men and women and put them to 
work, often at personal sacrifice, for the Society's advance- 
ment. It is not a sense of duty which inspires them to take 
positions on the Board of Trustees, but rather a genuine 
interest in the pursuit of horticulture, both as a vocation and 
an avocation, a belief that they are helping to bring happiness 
and contentment to a great number of people and that the 
service which the society is performing is distinctly worth- 
while. 

As I stressed in my address last year, service is the keynote 
of the Society's work and the watchword of its officers. This 
fact is kept constantly before the employees, with emphasis 
on courtesy and helpfulness in every department. Without 
them, the claim of service is an empty gesture. 

Edwin S. Webster, President 

Report of the Secretary 

The Secretary reported at the annual meeting last year that 
the membership figures had climbed to 8,952. This year he is 



ANNUAL MEETING, 1938 73 

able to say that they have gone over the 9,000 mark, with a 
total of 9,044. The gain has not been as rapid as in recent 
years, probably because of business conditions, but the goal of 
10,000 is still in sight. Members can do much to help the 
Society by suggesting to their friends that they might be 
benefited by enrolling in this organization. We do no direct 
solicitation, and so far as the Secretary knows the Society has 
never conducted a so-called drive. Little advantage is to be 
found in obtaining members who lack a genuine interest in the 
society and its work. Nevertheless, we send out a great many 
letters of invitation, calling attention to the work of the 
Society in order that we may be of service to as many persons 
as possible. This is part of our routine, and we find that the 
flow of membership inquiries diminishes when this work is 
interrupted. 

The shows are helpful in extending the Society's member- 
ship, many additions being made at the Spring show in par- 
ticular. The Society's booth at the Spring show serves a double 
purpose — it offers those in charge an opportunity to answer 
questions about the Society, its library and its work and it 
provides also a source of information about the show itself 
and the location of the various exhibits. It is, therefore, a joint 
information booth. 

For various reasons, the Society's dinner in Horticultural 
Hall, which many of the members had hoped would become an 
annual event, was omitted this year. This does not mean, how- 
ever, that no more dinners will be held. The subject is certain 
to receive consideration when next year's Spring exhibition is 
near at hand. 

One important event the past year was the completion and 
opening of a new room on the third floor and the extension of 
the elevator to this floor. This room is now frequently used 
for committee meetings, classes and for the gatherings of alive 
organizations. The Herb Society of America and the Garden 
Club Federation of Massachusetts have their files in this 
room, which has become, in effect, their headquarters. Pictures 
for the decoration of the room have been contributed by Mrs. 
S. V. R. Crosby and by Mr. Wilfrid Wheeler. Mrs. Crosby also 
has donated twelve new chairs for this room. These chairs 
match a large table of the director's type purchased by the 
society. 



74 



MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 



In addition to the gift of the pictures just mentioned, Mr. 
Wheeler has presented the Society two very handsome metal 
vases which have a place in the Secretary's office, and for 
which the Trustees recently gave him a vote of thanks. Some 
time ago, Mr. Wheeler presented the Society a large glass case 
designed for the display of curios. A stand for this case was 
constructed under the direction of Mr. Cummings, Chairman 
of the Committee on the Building, and the case has been 
placed in the Library, being used to contain the President's 
Cup, the Albert C. Burrage Gold Cup, the Beacon Hill Garden 




A section of Mr. Edwin S. Webster's exhibit at the Autumn show in 

1987. 



ANNUAL MEETING, 1938 75 

Club's Cup and many medals. This exhibit of the Society's 
trophies interests many visitors. The Beacon Hill Garden 
Club's cup is a perpetual trophy which has been given the 
Society in memory of Mrs. Charles Norton and Mrs. Ellery 
Sedgwick, to be offered as a prize each year in the garden club 
section at the Spring show. Following the show, the winner's 
name is to be inscribed and the cup is to be kept on display in 
the hall. 

"The Gardener's Omnibus," which has been prepared by the 
staff and which is now in circulation, is being published by 
Hale, Cushman & Flint under an arrangement by which a 
royalty is paid to this Society on each book sold. The book 
contains much of the material which has been published in 
HORTICULTURE and the Society's bulletins the past three 
years. It contains about 800 pages and 400 illustrations. Its 
preparation has required a great amount of time and labor, 
but it is expected to add something to the Society's revenue 
over a period of years. An edition of 7000 was printed and 
copies have been widely distributed. 

The circulation of the Society's magazine HORTICUL- 
TURE has been increased. The total circulation is now about 
30,000. The paper continues to publish without charge the 
advertisements of private gardeners seeking positions. The 
inauguration of this plan several years ago has resulted in 
such an increase of applications that what amounts to an em- 
ployment bureau has been developed, being carried on under 
the direction of Mr. Geehan. This work is performed without 
charge and has become important because of the many high 
grade gardeners and superintendents who have been deprived 
of good positions on estates by the necessary financial economy 
of their employers. 

There has been a continuous demand for the Society's bul- 
letins, particularly the one by Mrs. Hollis Webster on herbs. 
Several thousand copies of this booklet have been sold and 
have gone to all parts of the country. A new bulletin on lawns 
and their maintenance has been put into circulation the past 
year. 

The Society has continued to co-operate with the Gardeners' 
and Florists' Club of Boston in putting on monthly meetings 
with lectures. The attendance has been satisfactory, but the 
number of plants sent in for examination has been somewhat 



76 MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

smaller than we had hoped. The exhibits at the meetings of 
the Gardeners' and Florists' Club itself, which are held in this 
building each month always bring out a large collection of 
plants, and possibly the gardeners do not feel like making two 
trips to the hall each month. Whether these meetings will be 
continued another year is a matter for discussion by the mem- 
bers of both organizations. 

Last Winter the hall was open for a series of lectures in a 
science course for gardeners given under the direction of the 
National Gardeners' Association with the co-operation of this 
society. This Spring a series of lectures on home garden design 
has been given by Robert S. Sturtevant under the auspices of 
the State Department of Education with this society's co- 
operation. 

The Secretary desires to express his appreciation of the kind- 
ness shown him and the co-operation given him by the officers, 
trustees, committees and members. He also thanks the mem- 
bers of his staff. 

E. I. Farrington, Secretary 

Report of the Treasurer 

STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AT 
DECEMBER 31, 1937 

Assets 

Cash in banks and on hand $ 18,328.40 

Treasurer $ 14,734.30 

Bursar : 

In bank 2,136.21 

On hand 10.00 

Savings bank deposits 1,447.89 

$ 18,328.40 

Investments — Valued at cost — Schedule A-l 551,315.80 

Capital Assets 593,434.83 

Real estate $498,564.63 

Improvements and additions to buildings . . . 28,858.85 

Library 46,580.47 

Furniture and exhibition ware 10,532.31 

Massachusetts Horticultural Society History 6,187.00 
Lantern slides 2,711.57 

$593,434.83 

Deferred Charges 5,480.83 

Spring Show, 1938. 



78 massachusetts horticultural society 

Liabilities and Capital Funds 

Liabilities — Accounts Payable 164.81 

Sundry Funds „ 444,067.30 

Special uses: 

Principal $156,913.73 

Unexpended income 8,210.27 

$165,124.00 
General uses: 

Principal 278,943.30 

$444,067.30 

Prizes not distributed 28.50 

Life membership fees 22,294.00 

Mount Auburn Cemetery Fund 52,197.09 

Library Cataloging Fund 1,000.00 

Capital 564,524.70 

Surplus— (Capital) 51,418.71 

Balance, January 1, 1937 $ 46,789.57 

Add: Gains on sales of securities 4,629.14 

$ 51,418.71 

Surplus— (Earned) 32,864.75 

Balance, January 1, 1937 $ 29,983.96 

Excess of income over expenditures 2,880.79 

$ 32,864.75 



$1,168,559.86 

STATEMENT OF INCOME AND EXPENDITURES 

Year Ended Year Ended 

December 31, 1937 December 31, 1936 

Income 
Income from investments 

and bank interest (less 

proportion allocated to 

restricted funds) $25,872.08 $26,515.37 

Membership fees 15,958.00 15,453.00 

Rentals 2,314.40 3,902.42 

Spring Show— 1937— 

Schedule B-l 23,941.01 

Spring Show — 1936 — 

Schedule B-l 10,300.59 

Incidentals 151.74 171.18 

Sundry donations 53.00 100.00 

Lantern slides — income . . . 45.80 53.50 

Transferred from Show 

Fund .. 2,800.00 

$68,336.03 $59,296.06 
Add: ''Horticulture" in- 
come 163.14 

$68,336.03 $59,459.20 



ANNUAL MEETING, 1938 79 

Expenditures 

Operating Expenses: 

Building expenses — 

schedule B-3 $17,070.71 $17,717.09 

Library expenses — 

schedule B-4 7,240.35 6,221.03 

Office and general ex- 
penses—schedule B-5 . 33,205.64 29,406.06 

Miscellaneous exhibition 
expenses — schedule 
B-6 5,566.23 3,776.49 

Autumn Show— 1937 . . . 1,026.74 



$64,109.67 $57,120.67 

Awards, Lectures, and Mis- 
cellaneous : 

Lectures 520.40 389.30 

Medals and certificates. . 334.82 671.05 

Prizes in excess of funds 1,350.76 

Banquet of the society. . 308.30 



1,163.52 2,411.11 
Add: " Horticulture" loss 182.05 



455.24 $59,531.78 



Excess of Income Over Ex- 
penditures — Transferred 
to Surplus Earned $ 2,880.79 



Excess of Expenditures 
Over Income — Trans- 
ferred to Surplus Earned $ 72.58 



INVESTMENTS AT DECEMBER 31, 1937 

Rate Maturity Cost 

% Date Value 

Bonds 

$15,000 Alabama Power Company 5 6/1/51 $ 14,999.73 

5,000 Allis Chalmers Manufacturing Co. 4 9/1/52 5,100.00 

5,000 American European Securities Co. 5 5/1/58 5,000.00 

15,000 Anaconda Copper Mining Co 43^ 10/1/50 14,943.75 

15,000 Atlantic Coast Line Railroad 4 7/1/52 14,608.11 

15,000 Central Pacific Ry. Co. Through 

Short Line 4 10/1/54 14,943.75 

15,000 Columbus Electric and Power Co. . 5 11/1/54 14,700.00 

15,000 Commonwealth Subsidiary Corp. . 5^ 9/1/58 15,665.20 

15,000 Eastern Gas & Fuel Associates ... 4 3/1/56 14,475.00 

15,000 Georgia Power Co 5 3/1/67 14,550.00 

15,000 Houston Gulf Gas Co 6 4/1/43 15,672.58 

15,000 Los Angeles Electric Co. Dept. 

Water & Power 3^ 1/15/66 15,450.00 

15,000 Louisville and Nashville R. R 4 7/1/40 16,151.86 

15,000 New York Power & Light Co 43^ 10/1/67 14,197.00 



80 MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

5,000 North American Edison Co. "C" . 5 

15,000 North American Edison Co 5}4 

15,000 Oklahoma Natural Gas Conv. deb. 5 

10,000 Panhandle Eastern Pipe Line Co. . 4 

15,000 Penn-Ohio Edison Co 6 

14,000 Potomac Edison Co 5 

20,000 Puget Sound Power & Light Co. . . bV 2 
15,000 Railway & Light Securities — 11th 

Series 4^ 

8,000 Shell Union Oil Corp 3^ 

12,000 Scoville Manufacturing Co 5^ 

15,000 Shawinigan Water & Power Co. . . 43^ 

15,000 Union Pacific R. R. Co. . 4 

10,000 Washington Water Power Co. ... . 5 

5,000 West Virginia Pulp and Paper Co. . 4^ 



11/15/69 


4,775.00 


8/15/63 


12,789.84 


5/1/46 


15,000.00 


3/1/52 


9,750.00 


11/1/50 


12,113.91 


11/1/56 


12,222.22 


6/1/49 


17,445.00 


10/1/55 


15,000.00 


3/1/51 


7,920.00 


1/1/45 


12,420.00 


5/1/68 


14,775.00 


7/1/47 


13,650.00 


1/1/60 


9,418.75 


12/1/52 


5,000.00 



Total bonds $352,736.70 



Stocks 

50 shs. American Can Co $ 5,650.91 

100 shs. American Telephone & Telegraph Co 14,766.96 

100 shs. American Tobacco "B" 10,200.23 

200 shs. Buffalo, Niagara, and Eastern Power Co. Pfd 4,150.00 

150 shs. Commercial Credit Corp. 4^% conv. pfd 1 -. g 774 m 

26 shs. Commercial Credit Corp. common / ' 

100 shs. Consumers' Power Co. 4.50 pfd 10,050.00 

265 136/600 shs. Electric Bond and Share Co \ «n aqq qq 

2,192 shs. General Electric Co. common / l6 >^-* 6 

100 shs. First National Bank of Boston 5,025.00 

30 shs. Fisk Rubber Co. pfd 8,011.82 

20 shs. International Match Realization Co. Ltd. V. T. C. . 4,661.25 

500 shs. National Power & Light Co. $6 pfd 50,750.00 

160 shs. North American Co. $3 pfd 6,871.50 

100 shs. Northern States Power Co. 7% pfd 7,548.75 

365 2/6 shs. Radio Corp. of America common 

500 shs. Southern California Edison Co. bY 2 % pfd 13,750.00 

400 shs. Tampa Electric Co. common 14,218.32 

200 shs. United Fruit Co 12,660.00 

Total stocks $198,579.10 



Summary 

Bonds $352,736.70 

Stocks 198,579.10 

Total $551,315.80 




The courtyard of the Massachusetts Mutual Life Insurance Company's 
building at Springfield. The company was given a garden certificate for 
the planting on its grounds. Olmsted Brothers, landscape architects. 



82 



MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 



Income Principal 



SUNDRY FUNDS AT DECEMBER 31, 1937 

Unexpended 
Total 
Income to Be Used for Special 

Purposes: 

Samuel Appleton Fund 

Josiah Bradley Fund 

Albert Cameron Burrage — Library 
Albert Cameron Burrage — Show . . 
Albert Cameron Burrage — Porch 

Fund 

John C. Chaffin Fund 

William N. Craig Fund 

Benjamin H. David Fund 

Jackson Dawson Memorial Fund . . 

John S. Farlow Fund 

John S. Farlow Fund — Newton 

Horticultural Society 

Benjamin V. French Fund — No. 1 . 
Benjamin V. French Fund — No. 2 . 

John Allen French Fund 

John D. Williams French Fund . . . 
Henry A. Gane Memorial Fund. . . 
H. H. Hunnewell Fund — No. 1 . . . 
H. H. Hunnewell Fund— No. 2 . . . 
H. H. Hunnewell Fund— No. 3 . . . 

John A. Lowell Fund 

Theodore Lyman Fund — No. 1 . . . 
Theodore Lyman Fund — No. 2 . . . 

Benjamin H. Pierce Fund 

Thomas Roland Fund 

John Lewis Russell Fund 

Show Fund 

William J. Walker Fund 

Levi Whitcomb Fund 

George Robert White Fund 

Marshall P. Wilder Fund 



1,000.00 

1,000.00 

33,765.57 

20,780.00 


3,765.57 
780.00 


1,000.00 

1,000.00 

30,000.00 

20,000.00 


1,482.62 


232.62 


1,250.00 


1,000.89 
2,601.27 


.89 
101.27 


1,000.00 
2,500.00 


500.00 




500.00 


3,499.21 


272.21 


3,227.00 


2,531.18 


31.18 


2,500.00 


2,900.42 




2,900.42 


500.00 




500.00 


3,000.00 

5,000.61 

11,708.61 


.61 
26.73 


3,000.00 
5,000.00 

11,681.88 


1,000.00 




1,000.00 


810.50 


310.50 


500.00 


2,049.00 
1,500.00 
1,000.00 
1,000.00 
10,000.00 
1,182.20 


49.00 
382.20 


2,000.00 
1,500.00 
1,000.00 
1,000.00 
10,000.00 
800.00 


3,564.71 
1,386.08 


564.71 

386.08 


3,000.00 
1,000.00 


35,200.00 




35,200.00 


2,354.61 


.18 


2,354.43 


502.50 


2.50 


500.00 


11,304.02 
1,000.00 


1,304.02 


10,000.00 
1,000.00 



Total $165,124.00 $8,210.27 $156,913.73 



Income to Be Used for General 
Purposes: 

Anonymous Funds $ 1,000.00 

Albert Cameron Burrage Fund 1,200.00 

John Chaney Fund 1,000.00 

Helen Collamore Fund 5,000.00 

Arthur F. Estabrook 49,100.00 

Ida F. Estabrook 11,638.76 

Caroline F. Freeman Fund 10,000.00 

Francis Brown Hayes Bequest. . . . 189,904.54 

Francis Brown Hayes Fund 10,000.00 

Margaret Whitney Fund 100.00 

Total $278,943.30 



$ 1,000.00 

1,200.00 

1,000.00 

5,000.00 

49,100.00 

11,638.76 

10,000.00 

189,904.54 

10,000.00 

100.00 

$278,943.30 



ANNUAL MEETING, 1938 



83 



INCOME AND EXPENSES OF THE SPRING SHOWS IN 

1936 AND 1937 

Spring Show, 1937 Spring Show, 1936 

Income: 

Tickets: 

Regular admission. . . . $49,684.75 

Trade tickets 3,494.25 

Students' tickets 198.50 

Members' tickets 9,474.36 

Garden Club tickets. . . 8,313.50 

Miscellaneous tickets . . 4.00 



Programs 

Flower booth 

Checking 

Restaurant 

Trade space 

Wheel chairs 

Peat and paper 
Plant material sold. 
Miscellaneous 





$39,747.25 

3,317.25 

118.00 






8,112.95 
6,274.00 






28.40 




$71,169.36 
2,650.11 




$57,597.85 
1,678.99 


4,404.94 
449.25 




3,630.15 
355.15 


1,172.59 

9,557.40 

107.80 




1,104.53 

9,642.70 

91.90 

498.74 


170.10 




52.00 
2.75 



Expenditures: 

Carting $ 281.90 

Committee expense 243.31 

Committee fees 375.00 

Decorating 9,576.35 

Garden Club expense. . . . 750.00 

Insurance 241.58 

Judges' expense 210.60 

Labor 2,637.31 

Manager's commission 

and salary 4,660.12 

Manager's expenses 87.82 

Music 595.00 

Plant material and forcing 2,235. 15 

Police 500.00 

Postage, stationery and 

supplies 734.02 

Printing 523.78 

Prizes 18,241.52 

Garden awards 675.00 

Medals and certificates . . 39.43 
Publicity expense and 

commissions 8,041.12 

Rentals 9,774.00 

Rubbish removal 360.00 

Telephone and telegraph. 130.61 

Miscellaneous 728.94 

Flower booth expense 3,530.27 



,681.55 



$74,654.76 



\ 66.25 
219.05 
215.00 

2,431.84 
750.00 
204.08 
718.29 

2,950.27 

3,210.45 
98.92 

385.00 
1,396.25 

400.00 

926.36 
578.09 
24,937.50 
900.00 
661.66 

7,775.02 
8,985.71 
360.00 
84.25 
1,090.87 
3,042.92 



84 MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 



Wheel chairs 


358.46 
108.95 
100.30 


65,740.54 
$23,941.01 


1,877.29 
89.10 










64,354.17 


Excess of Income over Ex- 
penditures — Transferred 
to General Income — ex- 
hibit B 


$10,300.59 





"HORTICULTURE" 

Statement of Income and Expenditure 

Year Ended Year Ended 

December 31, 1937 December 31, 1936 

Income : 

Advertising $27,454.42 $28,373.26 

Subscriptions 20,632.83 19,660.85 

Books 195.23 111.26 

Garden Club News 3,506.27 2,043.97 

Miscellaneous 255.34 2,268.54 

$52,044.09 $52,457.88 

Expenditure : 

Printing $19,438.40 $21,609.75 

Paper 9,928.33 9,168.12 

Cuts 2,827.98 2,752.17 

Wrappers 507.67 524.88 

Postage 4,437.43 4,025.70 

Books 135.52 63.38 

Garden Club News 2,754.62 1,304.39 

Commissions and dis- 
counts 4,252.72 4,720.05 

Contributions 1,391.65 1,368.80 

Salaries 4,000.00 4,000.00 

Miscellaneous 2,551.82 2,757.50 

52,226.14 52,294.74 

$ 182.05 

$ 163.14 



BUILDING EXPENSE 

Year Ended Year Ended 

December December 

31, 1937 31, 1936 

Labor $10,628.00 $10,526.50 

Supplies 207.52 443.29 

Heating 1,191.40 1,420.79 



ANNUAL MEETING, 1938 

Lighting 1,488.93 

Repairs 1,655.07 

Insurance 1,428.21 

Incidentals 471.58 

Total $17,070.71 



85 

1,698.87 

1,278.94 

1,923.35 

425.35 

$17,717.09 



LIBRARY EXPENSES 

Year Ended Year Ended 

December December 

31, 1937 31, 1936 

Salaries $5,134.39 $4,549.24 

Binding and repairs 1,382.77 914.69 

Books and periodicals 46.46 9.80 

Printing 251.75 460.30 

Stationery and postage 11.73 91.48 

Supplies 399.95 176.45 

Insurance 9.60 9.60 

Incidentals 1.50 9.47 

Repairs 2.20 

Total $7,240.35 $6,221.03 



OFFICE AND GENERAL EXPENSES 

Year Ended Year Ended 

December December 

31 1937 31 1936 

Salaries $18',268.66 $15' 163.20 

Stationery and postage 2,897.56 2,980.06 

Printing 2,888.99 1,888.89 

Supplies 590.46 530.06 

Telephone and telegraph 710.37 723.22 

Traveling 129.77 432.28 

Subscriptions of members to "Horticulture" . . . 6,603.75 6,403.32 

Incidentals 1,100.18 1,237.58 

Repairs 15.90 43.05 

Binding 4.40 

Total $33,205.64 $29,406.06 



MISCELLANEOUS EXHIBITION EXPENSE 

Year Ended Year Ended 

December December 

31, 1937 31, 1936 

Salary $3,315.10 $2,062.98 

Printing 678.49 636.82 

Supplies 765.49 115.91 

Advertising 100.00 125.00 

Exhibition committee fees 315.00 355.00 

Prize committee fees. 95.00 95.00 



S6* Massachusetts horticultural society 

Traveling 89.80 231.02 

Miscellaneous 76.45 

Incidentals 130.90 146.3i 

Judges' expense 8.45 



Total $5,566.23 $3,776.49 

AUTUMN SHOW, 1937 

Income: 

Tickets $1,556.95 

From Show Fund 439.00 

$1,995.95 

Expenses: 

Salary and labor 108.00 

Advertising 243.79 

Lettering 11.45 

Printing 136.26 

Supplies 88.30 

Judges' expense 64.91 

Prize committee fees 25.00 

Decorating 160.00 

Manager's expense 12.80 

Rubbish 15.00 

Incidentals 6.00 

Prizes : 

Vegetable 10.00 

Fruit 131.50 

Plant and flower 1,705.00 

Garden awards 275.00 

Medals and certificates 29.68 

3,022.69 

Net Loss $1,026.74 

Respectfully submitted, 

John S. Ames, Treasurer. 

Report of the Library Committee 

The period since my last report has seen the Library develop 
in several directions. The book collection has added the usual 
current books and magazines, and has been fortunate in re- 
ceiving several gifts. 

Two are of special importance. The first was the horticul- 
tural library of the late William J. Stewart, presented by his 
daughter, Mrs. Ellen Stewart Crouse. Mr. Stewart was well 
known as the founder of Horticulture and as its editor for 
many years, and his library is a fine working collection of the 
early 1900's. The second gift was the Frances Torrey Norton 



ANNUAL MEETING, 1938 87 

memorial from the Herb Society of America. This has already- 
been described in Horticulture, so that I need not comment on 
it now. 

From its own funds the Library made one purchase that 
should be mentioned, Jean Simon Kerner's "Figures des Plantes 
Economiques." Its eight volumes include hundreds of flowers 
and vegetables of the late eighteenth century. The engraving 
and coloring are very fine, and the binding, a beautiful con- 
temporary calf, is in almost perfect condition. The set is a 
very rare one. 

Last Summer about three thousand little-used volumes were 
withdrawn from the open shelves, and the reading room was 
rearranged more conveniently. Visitors will have seen also 
the case in which our cups and medals are shown. This case 
was a gift from Mr. Wilfrid Wheeler. 

The total number of volumes loaned was 4711, a drop of 300 
from the year before. The downward movement stopped sud- 
denly in November of its own accord, and borrowing has been 
unusually active for the last four months. The staff have had a 
busy year in other ways, for a larger number of members come 
to the reading room to study. At the same time the trustees' 
room is being used more often for committee meetings, and 
during part of the year there is more traffic through the Li- 
brary than a really good study room should have. Since we 
cannot make over our quarters, we can only hope that com- 
mittees will be as considerate as possible of readers. 

The Library has had several opportunities to cooperate with 
other organizations, as follows: 

With the New England Wild Flower Preservation Society 
at its last two annual meetings, by preparing exhibits of books 
on conservation. 

With the New England Gladiolus Society, which asked us 
to prepare a special exhibit of books, nursery catalogues, and 
schedules for the Gladiolus Show. 

With three garden clubs, to which members of the staff gave 
talks on garden books. 

With the Gardeners' and Florists' Club of Boston, which 
invited the Librarian to speak at a meeting. Following the cus- 
tom of the last few years, the library has also been opened for 
two hours every Monday evening during the winter for the 
Gardeners' and Florists' Course. It has been observed that on 



88 



MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 



these nights the room is well patronized only when reading is 
required by the instructors. 

Opening the library in the evening during the major flower 
shows in the fall has been a successful experiment, and the ad- 
dition of the library staff to the personnel of the Society's booth 
at the Spring Show seems likewise to have become an estab- 
lished custom. 

Nathaniel T. Kidder, Chairman 




A garden certificate was given in 1937 for the landscaping of the grounds 
which surround the new City Hall in Newton. Olmsted Brothers, land- 
scape architects. 



Report of the Exhibition Committee 

Your chairman submits the following report for the Exhibi- 
tion Committee. A review of the exhibitions of the past sev- 
eral years raises the question as to whether or not we are plac- 
ing too much emphasis on the great Spring Show and thereby 
neglecting more seasonal displays. Your chairman speaks of 
this because of the apparent renewal of interest in some of the 
smaller exhibitions, that of the Narcissus being one in point. 



ANNUAL MEETING. 1938 89 

This has seemed so worth while that the committee has added 
a date when the Tulip may have its day. Formerly we had two 
exhibitions in June and took more advantage of its wealth of 
material over the whole month; now with only one exhibition, 
many of the things that graced our shows of the past in this 
month are missing, something which we regret. The fact that 
the Gladiolus Society in the hottest month of the Summer can 
stage an exhibit of its specialty and can bring together a large 
group of enthusiasts leads one to wonder if more seasonal ex- 
hibitions should not be encouraged. Your chairman realizes, 
of course, that there are many very good reasons for making 
the greatest effort of the year at the Spring Show, but there are 
many reasons, too, for encouraging the smaller shows. 

The exhibition of Narcissi in April was a decided success 
and should become a regular part of our schedule; it is also 
hoped by your committee that the coming Tulip Show in May 
will attract even more exhibits and a larger attendance. 

A feature of the June show in 1937 was a remarkable ex- 
hibit of hardy lilies from John Scheepers of New York. It is 
doubtful if ever before at any exhibition of our Society has 
such a variety of liliums been exhibited by one person. As us- 
ual at this exhibition the peony was the center of attraction; 
the old standbys such as roses, rhododendrons and azaleas were 
in the minority. 

For the Mid-Summer Exhibition in 1937 the hall was turned 
over to the Gladiolus Society, and this organization did a 
splendid piece of work, utilizing the decorative quality of this 
popular flower to the utmost and filling the main halls with a 
display that was truly remarkable. The interest in new varie- 
ties and the results of the work of the hybridist bring together 
a group of people whose enthusiasm is hard to equal in the 
horticultural field. Much the same condition prevails in the 
Dahlia Society, and its successful show in September was con- 
ducted along the same lines as was the mid-summer Gladiolus 
Exhibition. 

For the early October show your committee went afield for 
its feature display and brought from the Xew York Experi- 
ment Station one of the most remarkable exhibits of seedling- 
grapes that was ever assembled in one hall. The Xew York 
station has been working on this subject for many years and is 
hoping to develop such varieties for our northern states as will 



90 MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

have hardiness, earliness and high quality combined to such an 
extent that grapes may be grown more widely by amateurs as 
well as by commercial growers. This exhibit attracted much 
attention, as did also several collections of seedling apples and 
pears. The Geneva Experiment Station is much interested in 
the development of the hazel nut and in its display of some 50 
seedlings showed truly remarkable progress in the hybridiza- 
tion of this nut. 

The late Autumn show in November attracted an unusually 
large attendance and was perhaps the most colorful Autumn 
show held in recent years. That Massachusetts has a great 
variation in its climate, was evidenced at this time by a dis- 
play of splendidly grown, outdoor hybrid tea roses from Fal- 
mouth, while naturally most of the flowers shown were green- 
house grown. 

The outstanding exhibit at this show was a garden featuring 
chrysanthemums and exhibited by Mrs. Francis B. Crownin- 
shield, Thomas Murray, gardener. This exhibit was later 
awarded the Burrage Gold Vase, the outstanding award of the 
year. 

The primary work of your committee throughout the year 
really centers around the Spring exhibition. The problem of 
keeping up the interest of the exhibitors, creating a different 
show — one that will attract the public — and still maintain a 
high horticultural standard, is an increasingly difficult one. 
For the 1938 show your committee early resolved on two 
definite measures. First, to reduce the number of exhibits. 
Second, to create a colorful show. Realizing in the first instance 
that the public needs more room to really see a show, the aisles 
were broadened and a layout was made that gave everyone easy 
access to exhibits in Exhibition Hall from at least two sides and 
in most cases from three. The success of this plan was apparent 
from the first, for on Friday with an attendance of over 22,000, 
the largest day at any Boston flower show, there was no severe 
overcrowding, and at only one point in the show was it found 
necessary to establish one way traffic. Color was emphasized 
in most exhibits, so that no matter where one turned this fact 
was apparent. 

In Grand Hall the policy of a year ago was followed, the 
whole hall being treated as a unit, this time with a modern 
country house surrounded by modern gardens and looking off 



ANNUAL MEETING, 1938 91 

into the natural landscape. Your committee expected consider- 
able adverse criticism in attempting such an abrupt departure 
from the conventional flower show, and were much surprised at 
the favorable comments. One had only to go into this hall at 
any time to note the large numbers of people seated in the 
gallery and enjoying the vest restful scene. Your committee is 
much indebted to Mr. Egbert Hans, who again acted as our 
consultant in arranging this hall. 

Your chairman cannot attempt to write in detail of the 
many splendid exhibits and the very high quality of them. It 
would be difficult to recall an exhibition where color harmony, 
quality of material, and arrangement were so skillfully dis- 
played, yet your chairman cannot pass over the beauty of the 
rose room (Paul Revere Hall). Here the grouping of the 
classes in large vases so that visitors could go around them and 
come into close contact with the flowers themselves and feel- 
ing that they had a close-up of the entire exhibition, made a 
complete harmony, and as the great displays at each end were 
added nothing could be wanting from the picture with the ex- 
ception of a better type of vase for the classes. 

Your chairman would like to make some recommendations 
for coming flower shows, believing that future committees 
will welcome anything that gives them a chance to make a 
change. 

Looking back to the Spring Show of 1932, which was held in 
our own hall and made a profit of $15,000 on a total atten- 
dance of 41,000, your chairman sometimes wonders if the huge 
effort and expenditure at Mechanics Building are in keeping 
with the little extra that is made over and above the profit of 
the 1932 show. Possibly this is not quite the way to look at the 
matter, for in the Spring Show at Mechanics Building there is 
a certain get together of all the horticultural interests that 
would not be possible in our much more restricted place. Yet 
your chairman recalls as one of the greatest feats of showman- 
ship the Japanese garden arranged in our hall by James F. M. 
Farquhar in 1912, when the whole hall was treated as a unit. 
The visitors, all going one way, passed through by the thou- 
sands. 

There is a possibility of having two major shows at our hall, 
one in March, and one in February, when at least we would 
not run the chances of failure that we now run in the larger 



92 MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

show at Mechanics Building. The fact that this year summer- 
like weather on the last three days cut our attendance severely 
should lead us to consider some other possibility or at least 
some alternative. 

Your chairman believes that if the larger show is held it 
should be as early as possible in March and run five days, be- 
ginning on the first day at noon. 

Never before has the garden club section worked out in a 
more harmonious and pleasing picture than was arranged this 
year at the Spring Show. The gardens of the 18th century 
grouped about a summer house were delightful in their old 
time charm and your chairman wishes to take this occasion to 
compliment the chairwomen of this section for the efficient, fric- 
tionless manner in which the exhibit was staged. It was a joy 
to be associated with this group. 

It is doubtful if ever has our show had such remarkable pub- 
licity. This was handled most efficiently by our able secretary, 
Mr. E. I. Farrington. One feature was the creation of interest 
in the show through the country papers. 

In closing this brief report, your chairman brings to an end 
five years of membership on this committee, the last as its chair- 
man ; it has been a very pleasant relationship and he wishes to 
sincerely thank all those with whom he has associated in the 
work. In our efficient manager, Mr. Nehrling, he has the high- 
est confidence and has enjoyed to the fullest the contacts with 
him on this committee. Mr. Webster, our beloved president, 
he wishes to thank for this opportunity to serve the Society for 
as Mr. Webster said in his last report "Service is the chief func- 
tion of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society." So it is for 
us to serve the Society and in this service your chairman has 
passed some of his happiest relations. 

Wilfrid Wheeler, Chairman 

Report of the Prize Committee 

The Prize and Exhibition Committees, as well as many ex- 
hibitors, feel that gold medals have been given so freely as to 
lessen their value. With the thought of enhancing the value of 
the society's medals, the Prize Committee, therefore, advises 
that the gold medal be given henceforth only to exhibits of ex- 
ceptional distinction, taking into consideration the element of 
improvement over what has been shown before, either by the 



ANNUAL MEETING, 1938 93 

same or another exhibitor. Under no circumstances should a 
gold medal be given for an exhibit inferior to the standard al- 
ready set in the past. Our silver medal will be awarded for 
exhibits of outstanding merit and the bronze medal for those 
of high average value. In this way, our bronze and silver 
medals will be more highly appreciated. 

Elimination two years ago of the plan by which the score 
was made the basis of medal awards has not resulted in lessen- 
ing the number of medals awarded, even though the Prize Com- 
mittee has the authority to award medals irrespective of scores 
and recommendations submitted by the judges, the reason be- 
ing that most exhibitors find it impossible to relinquish the idea 
of expecting a medal to accompany a high score. Our last show 
developed the realization that high scoring exhibitors experi- 
enced no satisfaction in receiving our silver or bronze medals. 

It may not be generally known to all interested in the judg- 
ing of the Spring Flower Show that it is not the Prize Commit- 
tee but the Exhibition Committee which decides what scale of 
points they wish used in judging each exhibit. Great care and 
consideration is given to the writing of the schedule and the 
basis on which the judging shall be done. 

Where imponderable, intangible, values in aesthetics are 
involved, the artist should determine the relative values under 
the terms of the program and notify the Exhibition Committee 
as to the basis on which they wish the exhibit judged and this 
will be entered on his judging sheet. 

It is the custom of the Prize Committee to select judges they 
think qualified to judge various aspects of an exhibit such as 
horticultural merit, rare varieties, aesthetic effect of artistic 
arrangement, etc. 

Judges will be asked to make full comments regarding the 
merit of one factor or another of an exhibit. They will also be 
asked to advise for horticultural and cultural awards. 

After weighing the matter carefully, the Prize Committee 
has decided that real benefit will be accomplished, both for the 
show and for exhibitors, if the awarding of the society's medals 
by the Prize Committee is put off until after the first day of the 
Spring show. This should tend to prolong interest in exhibitors' 
awards. 

William Elleky, Chairman 




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ANNUAL MEETING, 1938 95 

Report of the Committee on the Exhibition of the Products 

of Children's Gardens 

More general individual interest is needed in the show the 
children give each August in Horticultural Hall, Boston. Most 
of us like to work with children especially to encourage them 
in their work. A few years ago, a fine little garden was shown 
from the North End of Boston, where dolls were watering the 
plants and otherwise enjoying themselves. The children were 
helped in making this by a lady of Boston who must have taken 
delight in her work, it was so good. Another year a fine desert 
scene was shown in California by a Roxbury girl. Then there 
was a Cape Cod cottage put up by two boys and giving a charm 
to the Lecture Hall. 

This year all these special interesting little shows were lack- 
ing. Yet they are good for the children, in taxing their interest 
and ingenuity. Is there not some lady in Boston who would 
like to offer a special prize for these interesting individual 
shows put up by the children? 

Another feature of the show which was not so good in 1937 
as before was the exhibition of named wild flowers, but it may 
have been largely owing to the drought and extreme heat of the 
summer. A large and excellent exhibit of flowers was shown by 
Sandra Newland of Roslindale. This included fifty varieties, 
among which was an unusual sunflower, yellow and burnt 
orange in color. Dennis Crowley made an effective display 
from the children's garden in Waban, with a background of 
cornstalks and marigolds. Vegetables and other flowers were 
displayed. Brockton, as usual, won first prize for its harmoni- 
ously arranged flowers and vegetables. It also had the second 
prize this year. 

As a whole, the exhibition was good, but as I looked over 
the hall I felt that there were not as many flowers as in other 
years, which was probably owing to the drought. As I came 
away, I felt that more individual interest should be taken in 
these children's shows by the good people of Boston. 

Marion Roby Case, Chairman 



96 MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

The Result of the Balloting 

At 6 P.M. the polls were closed, seventy-three votes having 
been cast, and the following were declared elected. 

President, Edwin S. Webster. 

Vice President, William E. Ellery. 

Trustees, Samuel J. Goddard, Dr. Elmer D. Merrill, Harold 
S. Ross, Mrs. Bayard Thayer, William Prescott Wolcott. 

The revised by-laws submitted for action at this meeting 
were declared to have been adopted by vote of 71 to 2. The 
meeting was then adjourned. 



Massachusetts Horticultural 
Society 

HONORARY MEMBER 

1900 Dr. Henry S. Peitchett, New York. 



CORRESPONDING MEMBERS 

1925 D. M. Andrews, Boulder, Colorado. 

1925 Rudolph D. Anstead, Bournemouth, England. 

1921 J. F. Bailey, Director of the Botanic Gardens, Adelaide, 
South Australia. 

1889 De. L. H. Bailey, Ithaca, New York. 

1925 F. R. S. Balfoue, F. L. S., Dawyck, Stobo, Tweeddale, 
Scotland. 

1911 W. J. Bean, 2, Mortlake Road, Kew, England. 

1918 Desire Bois, Paris, France. 

1925 I. H. Buekill, F.L.S., "Clova," Fetcham Park, Leather- 
head, Surrey, England. 

1921 Feed J. Chittenden, Royal Horticultural Society, Vin- 
cent Square, Westminster, London, England. 

1925 Woon Young Chun, Sun Yatsen University, Canton, 
China. 

1925 Henei Coeeevon, Geneva, Switzerland. 

1925 G. W. Daenell-Smith, Director of the Sydney Botanic 
Gardens, Sydney, New South Wales. 

1925 Heney F. duPont, Winterthur, Delaware. 

1925 Pierre S. duPont, Wilmington Delaware. 

1925 Charles C. Eley, M.A., F.L.S., Suffolk, England. 

1925 I. B. Pole Evans, C.M.G., Chief of Division and Director 
Botanical Survey, Pretoria, South Africa. 

1925 G. Fraser, Ucluelet, Vancouver Island, British Columbia. 

1925 W. G. Freeman, B.S.C., F.L.S., Imperial Institute, South 
Kensington, London S.W.7, England. 

1900 Beverly T. Galloway, Department of Agriculture, 
Washington, D.C. 

1918 Professor N. E. Hansen, Brookings, South Dakota. 

1911 Professor U. P. Hedrick, Geneva, New York. 

97 



98 MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

1925 Sir Arthur W. Hill, K.C.M.G., F.R.S., F.L.S., Royal 
Botanic Gardens, Kew, Surrey, England. 

1925 Professor H. H. Hu. Fan Memorial Institute of Biology, 
Peking, China. 

1925 Mrs. C. L. Hutchinson, Lake Geneva, Wisconsin. 

1925 Charles W. Knight, Oakdale, New York. 

1921 C. E. Lane-Poole, Canberra, Australia. 

1911 M. Emile Lemoine, Nancy, France. 

1918 J. Horace McFarland, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. 

1925 John McLaren, San Francisco, California. 

1925 Mrs. William Mercer, Doylestown, Pennsylvania. 

1925 Dr. Kingo Miyabe, Imperial University, Sapparo, Japan. 

1898 Sir Frederick W. Moore, F.L.S., Willbrook House, Rath- 
farnham, Co. Dublin, Ireland. 

1918 Dr. George T. Moore, Botanical Gardens, St. Louis, 
Missouri. 

1925 F. Cleveland Morgan, Montreal, Canada. 

1925 M. L. Parde, Nogent-sur-Vernisson (Loiret), France. 

1906 Lt.-Col. Sir David Prain, C.M.G., F.R.S., F.L.S., War- 
lingham, Surrey, England. 

1925 Miss Isabella Preston, Ottawa, Canada. 

1925 Johannes Rafn, Skovfrokontoret, Copenhagen, Den- 
mark. 

1906 Dr. Henry N. Ridley, C.M.G., F.R.S., F.L.S., Kew, 
Surrey, England. 

1925 Camillo Schneider, Gartenschonheit, Berlin-Westend, 
Germany. 

1925 F. L. Skinner, Dropmore, Manitoba. 

1925 Sir William Wright Smith, F.L.S., Royal Botanic 
Garden, Edinburgh, Scotland. 

1893 Professor William Trelease, Urbana, Illinois. 

1918 F. Gomer Waterer, Knaphill, Surrey, England. 

1925 Cyril T. White, Government Botanist, Brisbane, 
Queensland, Australia. 

1919 J. C. Williams, Gorran, Cornwall, England. 

1921 Gurney Wilson, Secretary Royal Horticultural Society 
Orchid Committee, Vincent Square, - London S. W. 1, 
England. 

1925 John C. Wister, Germantown, Pennsylvania. 

1925 Major A. C. T. Woodward, Bewdley, Worcestershire, 
England. 



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NEW MEMBERS 



The following names were added to the membership rolls 
in 1937: 



Abbott, Mrs. Stanley N., Hamilton, 

Mass. 
Adams, Mr. Charles J., Dedham, 

Mass. 
Adams, Mrs. E. Gerald, Bellows 

Falls, Vermont 
Addison, Mrs. Amy, Winthrop, Mass. 
Ahlgren, Mrs. Wesley C, Stoughton, 

Mass. 
Alexander, Mr. George, Grosse 

Pointe Shores, Mich. 
Alexander, Mr. John, Swampscott, 

'Mass. 
Alger, Mr. N. A., South Easton, 

Mass. 
Allen, Mrs. C. Temple Jr., West 

Roxbury, Mass. 
Allen, Mr. G. M.. Medford, Mass. 
Allen, Mr. Herbert S., Manchester, 

N. H. 
Allen, Miss Sally S., Dorchester, 

Mass. 
Allen, Mr. Willis, Norwood, Mass. 
Alley, Miss Evelyn L., Hyde Park, 

Mass. 
Almquist, Mr. Henning, Quincy, 

Mass. 
Andersen, Mrs. Arthur, Newton 

Highlands, Mass. 
Andrew, Mrs. Lawrence C, Portland, 

Maine 
Andrews, Mr. Francis M., Water- 
town, Mass. 
Angus, Mrs. George R., Waban, 

Mass. 
Anthony, Mr. Nathan, Boston, Mass. 
Appel, Mrs. Richard G., Cambridge, 

Mass. 
Applebee, Mrs. Louie G., East Lynn, 

Mass. 
Appleton, Mr. Joseph D., Roxbury, 

Mass. 
Arkin, Miss Fannie, Sharon, Mass. 
Arroll, Mr. George James, Swamp- 
scott, Mass. 
Ashton, Mrs. Harry, Medford, Mass. 
Atwell, Mr. Vernon J., Melrose, 

Mass. 
Aubin, Mrs. H. Ralph, Belmont, 

Mass. 
Avakian, Mrs. Charles, Arlington, 

Mass. 
Ayling, Miss Edith C, Waban, 

Mass. 
Ayres, Mrs. Samuel, Cohasset, Mass. 
Babb, Mrs. Edward M., Portland, 

Maine 
Babson, Mr. Paul T., Wellesley, 

Mass. 



Backus, Miss Maud E., Newton 
Centre, Mass. 

*Backus, Mrs. Standish, Grosse 
Pointe, Michigan 

Bacon, Mr. George A., Longmeadow, 
Mass. 

Bacon, Miss Nellie L., Winthrop, 
Mass. 

Badger, Miss Annie W., Marble- 
head, Mass. 

Bailey, Mr. Norman S., Newton 
Centre, Mass. 

Bair, Mrs. M. W., Bristol, R. I. 

Baker, Mrs. Edna A., Needham, 
Mass. 

Balch, Mr. Orson, Boston, Mass. 

Baldwin, Mrs. Walter F., Waltham, 
Mass. 

Barber, Mrs. Walter H., Melrose 
Highlands, Mass. 

Barry, Mrs. Charles Arthur, Welles- 
ley Hills, Mass. 

Bartlett, Miss Stella, Dorchester, 
Mass. 

Barton, Mr. Charles, Upton, Mass. 

Batchelder, Mr. Charles F., Peter- 
boro, N. H. 

Batcheller, Mrs. Nellie F., East 
Douglas, Mass. 

Bateman, Miss Eleanor W., Boston, 
Mass. 

Bates, Mrs. Philip K., Belmont, 
Mass. 

Batty, Mrs. Eva H., York Village, 
Maine 

Bauer, Mrs. Walter, Waban, Mass. 

Bauernfeind, Mrs. Lillie, Medford, 
Mass. 

Beales, Mrs. Hubert, South Poland, 
Maine 

*Beals, Mrs. Ruth Dutcher, 
Hopedale, Mass. 

Beames, Mr. Oswald H., Falmouth, 
Mass. 

Beardsley, Miss Constance, Boston, 
Mass. 

Beck, Mrs. Herbert C, West Rox- 
bury, Mass. 

Becker, Mr. Stanton H., Roslindale, 
Mass. 

Belcher, Mrs. W. H., West Med- 
ford, Mass. 

Bell, Mr. John A., Reading, Mass. 

Bell, Mrs. John A., Reading, Mass.. 

Bennett, Mr. S. F., Wrentham, Mass. 

Bense, Mrs. William A., Canton, 
Mass. 

Benson, Miss Ethel, Dover, Mass. 

Berston, Mr. Jacob, Melrose., Mass. 



100 



NEW MEMBERS, 1937 



101 



Bessom, Miss Gertrude F., South 

Orleans, Mass. 
Bevington, Mrs. John H., Methuen, 

Mass. 
Bickley, Miss Fanny E., Fall River, 

Mass. 
Bigelow, Mrs. Nelson, Westwood, 

Mass. 
Biggart, Mr. William L., Needham, 

Mass. 
Bigwood, Miss Virginia, Dorchester, 

Mass. 
Billingsley, Mrs. Joe K., Newton 

Center, Mass. 
Bingham, Mrs. Herbert B., Waltham, 

Mass. 
Bissell, Miss Elizabeth, Westwood, 

Mass. 
Bixby, Mr. Harvey A., West 

Groton, Mass. 
Black, Mr. Herman A., Melrose, 

Mass. 
Black, Mr. John B., Hyde Park, 

Mass. 
Blake, Miss Beatrice F., Maiden, 

Mass. 
Blanchard, Mrs. George W., Bel- 
mont, Mass. 
Blanchard, Mrs. Otis, Woburn, 

Mass. 
Blood, Miss Ellen F., Brookline, 

Mass. 
Blossom, Miss Elizabeth T., Boston, 

Mass. 
Blunt, Mr. Joseph H., Andover, 

Mass. 
Bodge, Mrs. W. C, Auburndale, 

Mass. 
Borowski, Mr. Ernest H., Norwood, 

Mass. 
Bossom, Mrs. Campbell, Belmont, 

Mass. 
Boucher, Mrs. Ovila, New Bedford, 

Mass. 
Bowditch, Miss Caroline P., New- 
ton, Mass. 
Bowen, Miss Constance J., Boston, 

Mass. 
Bowers, Miss Bessie L., Camden, 

Maine 
Bowman, Mrs. Edward F., Boston, 

Mass. 
Boyd, Mrs. Ernest, Waltham, Mass. 
*Boyer-Miller, Mrs. R., Wenham, 

Mass. 
Boyle, Mrs. F. W., Medford, Mass. 
Boynton, Mrs. George H., Belmont, 

Mass. 
Brady, Mrs. Myra, Brookline, Mass. 
Branliere, Mrs. Mary Stickney, 

Bethel, Vermont 
Brewer, Miss Amy E., Marion, Mass. 
Brewer, Mrs. George E. Jr., 

Ipswich, Mass. 



Briggs, Mrs. Frederick H.. Boston, 

Mass. 
Briggs, Mr. Henry H., Melrose, 

Mass. 
Brigham, Miss Eleanor, Boston, 

Mass. 
Brimer, Mrs. Wallace E., Andover. 

Mass. 
Brock, Mr. Leon, Palmer, Mass. 
Brodhead, Mrs. John C, Roslindale, 

Mass. 
Brooks, Mrs. Everett N., Newton 

Lower Falls, Mass. 
Brooks, Mrs. F. H., South Lincoln, 

Mass. 
Brophy, Mrs. William F., Boston, 

Mass. 
Broughall, Mr. Patrick E., Milton, 

Mass. 
Brown, Mrs. Albert, Saugus. Mass. 
Brown, Mr. Alden K., Stratford, 

Conn. 
Brown, Mr. Edward T., Marble- 
head, Mass. 
Brown, Mr. Henry E.. Marblehead, 

Mass. 
Brown, Mrs. Ida M., Boston, Mass. 
Brown, Mrs. John F., Lakeport, 

N. H. 
Brown, Mr. Raymond A.. West 

Roxbury, Mass. 
Brown, Mrs. Robert E.. Andover. 

Mass. 
Bruorton, Mrs. Charles, Salem, 

Mass. 
Buchheister, Mrs. Carl W., Hingham, 

Mass. 
Buffum, Mrs. F. I., North Hanover, 

Mass. 
Burks, Mr. Dana Jr.. Slatersville, 

R. I. 
Burrus, Mrs. Russell L., Quincy, 

Mass. 
Bush, Mrs. J. N. D., Cambridge, 

Mass. 
Buss, Miss Kate, Medford, Mass. 
Bye. Mr. Andrew, Beverly, Mass. 
Cabot, Mr. George. New York City 
Cain, Mr. Theron I., East Wey- 
mouth, Mass. 
Calnek, Mrs. F., Boston. Mass. 
Cameron, Mrs. Mabel P., Belmont, 

Mass. 
Campbell, Mrs. John W., Brookline, 

Mass. 
Campbell. Miss Minnie W., New- 

buryport, Mass. 
Cannaway, Mrs. Pi-obert, Rockland. 

Mass. 
Capithorn, Mrs. Harry K., Laconia. 

N. H. 
Carder, Mrs. H. A., Groton, Mass. 
Carey, Mrs. Jane E., Brockton, 

Mass. 



102 



MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 



Carlsson, Miss Helen T., Canton, 

Mass. 
Carpenter, Miss Adelaide H., Need- 
ham, Mass. 
Carpenter, Mr. Donald W., West 

Roxbury, Mass. 
Carr, Mr. Walter D., Wellesley Hills, 

Mass. 
Carter, Mr. Lyon, Lexington, Mass. 
Carter, Miss Ruth S., Lexington. 

Mass. 
Casey, Mr. Bartholomew, Bridge- 
water, Mass. 
Cate, Mrs. Norman G., Auburndale, 

Mass. 
Catlin, Miss Ruth F., Wellesley, 

Mass. 
Cave, Mrs. James H., Dover, Mass. 
Chadsey, Mrs. Maude M., Roxbury, 

Mass. 
Chamberlain, Mrs. Allen, Pigeon 

Cove, Mass. 
Champlin, Mrs. William H., 

Rochester, N. H. 
Chandler, Mrs. Paul A., Auburndale, 

Mass. 
Chapin, Mrs. Sarah D., Waltham, 

Mass. 
Chase, Miss Alice G., Cambridge, 

Mass. 
Chase, Mrs. F. S., Melrose, Mass. 
Cheney, Mrs. Harry M., Concord, 

N. H. 
Chesley, Miss Bertha B., Lynn, 

Mass. 
Chick, Mrs. Walter G., Roslindale, 

Mass. 
Chickering, Mrs. James H., Dover, 

Mass. 
Child, Miss Florence B., Somerville, 

Mass. 
Churchill, Mrs. Clifford G., Welles- 
ley Hills, Mass. 
Clark, Mr. Ellery H. Jr., Boston, 

Mass. 
Clark, Miss Frances, Stoughton, 

Mass. 
Clark, Miss Virginia R., Lexington, 

Kentucky 
Clarke, Miss Martha, Boston, Mass. 
Cleary, Mr. Francis E., West Rox- 
bury, Mass. 
Coates, Mr. George E., Swampscott, 

Mass. 
Cogan, Dr. William D., Cambridge, 

Mass. 
Cogger, Mr. Thomas, Saugus, Mass. 
Coit, Mrs. George, Winchester, 

Mass. 
Coit, Miss Lucia, Winchester, Mass. 
Colbath, Mrs. Henry, Tewksbury, 

Mass. 
Cole, Mrs. Richard B., Newton 

Centre, Mass. 



Collamore, Miss Florence M., 
Braintree, Mass. 

Collier, Mr. Sargent, Boston, Mass. 

Collins, Mrs. Fred M., Swampscott, 
Mass. 

Collins, Mrs. Warren E. Jr., Roslin- 
dale, Mass. 

Colprit, Mr. Ernest S., Dover, N. H. 

Colton, Miss Dorothea, Jamaica 
Plain, Mass. 

Compton, Miss Minnie, Newton Cen- 
ter, Mass. 

Compton, Mrs. Winifred Warren, 
Chestnut Hill, Mass. 

Comstock, Mrs. Daniel Frost, 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Conant, Miss Bessie G., Whitman, 
Mass. 

Connors, Mr. John, Wakefield, Mass. 

Conway, Mrs. Harry, Harding, 
Mass. 

Coore, Mrs. Beatrice K., Lawrence, 
Mass. 

Corbett, Mrs. Margaret, Billerica, 
Mass. 

Cote, Mr. Joseph D., Danvers, Mass. 

Co wen, Miss Lilian D., Taunton, 
Mass. 

Cragin, Mr. S. Albert, Reading, 
Mass. 

Craig, Mrs. Marguerite M., North 
Easton, Mass. 

Crites, Mrs. Lloyd L. Hyde Park, 
Mass. 

Crocker, Mrs. George Jr., Brookline, 
Mass. 

Crockett, Mrs. Albert S., Winchester, 
Mass. 

Crockett, Mrs. Jessie Flagg, Ports- 
mouth, N. H. 

Crowninshield, Mrs. B. B., Marble- 
head, Mass. 

Cumming, Mr. Alex Jr., Bristol, 
Conn. 

Curtis, Mrs. Fred, North Abington, 
Mass. 

Curtis, Mr. Harold, Somerville, 
Mass. 

Cyr, Mr. Leo R., Rumford, Maine 

Daggett, Miss Mary A., Cambridge, 
Mass. 

Dailey, Mrs. Chester W., Brockton, 
Mass. 

Daly, Mrs. Priscilla, Boston, Mass. 

Dana, Mrs. Arthur P., South Yar- 
mouth, Mass. 

Daniels, Mr. Melvin, Beverly, Mass. 

Darling, Mrs. Arthur B., Andover, 
Mass. 

Darling, Mr. Cyrus, Westboro, Mass. 

Davidson, Mrs. Addie M., Brookline, 
Mass. 

Davidson, Mrs. Earl E., Chestnut 
Hill, Mass, 



NEW MEMBERS, 1937 



103 



Davis, Miss Carrie A., Jamaica 
Plain, Mass. 

Davis, Mr. Chester A., North 
Hampton, N. H. 

Davis, Mr. Clarence, Concord, N. H. 

Davis, Miss Virginia C, Roxbury, 
Mass. 

Day, Miss Annie F., Boston, Mass. 

Day, Mrs. John B. W., Westford, 
Mass. 

Dedrick, Miss Jessie L., Pigeon 
Cove, Mass. 

Dennis, Mrs. A. L. P., Seine In- 
ferieure, France 

Dennison, Mr. Albert F., Dedham, 
Mass. 

Denny, Mrs. E. Arthur, Worcester, 
Mass. 

Densmore, Mrs. J. M., Newton Cen- 
tre, Mass. 

Denton, Mr. Robert M., 
Westminster, Mass. 

Deschenes, Mrs. Homer, Swampscott, 
Mass. 

Despres, Mrs. Mary Louise. Law- 
rence, Mass. 

Devine, Dr. Winifred M., Lowell, 
Mass. 

Dewey, Mrs. Herbert H., Schenec- 
tady, New York 

Dewey, Mr. Robert C, Gardner, 
Mass. 

Dexter, Mr. Arthur L., Auburn, 
Mass. 

Dexter, Miss Rose L., Boston, Mass. 

Dexter, Mr. Walter C, Mattapoisett, 
Mass. 

Dey, Mr. Dexter G., Westwood, 
Mass. 

Dibbins, Mrs. Samuel A., Lowell, 
Mass. 

Dickson, Mr. B. H. 3d, Weston, 
Mass. 

Dillingham, Mrs. Norman S., Beach 
Bluff, Mass. 

Dobson, Miss Rose L., Hyde Park, 
Mass. 

Dodge, Mr. George E., Watertown, 
Mass. 

Donahoe, Mrs. Mary E., North 
Easton, Mass. 

Dow, Mr. C. W., Beach Bluff, Mass. 

Dow, Mr. Hale Macomber, West- 
brook, Maine 

Driscoll, Miss Mary J., West Rox- 
bury, Mass. 

Duff, Mrs. Mark M., New Bedford, 
Mass. 

Dupont, Mr. Charles T., Everett, 
Mass. 

Dutton, Miss Mabel Ober, Fairhaven, 
Mass. 

Dvorak, Mr. Charles, Fairhaven, 
Mass. 



Eaton, Mr. Edwin Choate, Auburn- 
dale, Mass. 
Eaton, Mrs. Margaret, Winchester, 

Mass. 
Eckhardt, Mrs. Charles, Islington, 

Mass. 
Eckman, Mrs. John, Roxbury, Mass. 
Eddy, Mrs. Clinton L., West Newton, 

Mass. 
Eddy, Mr. Jesse G., Pittsfield, Mass. 
Eddy, Mr. Sherman W., Avon, Conn. 
Eldridge, Mrs. S. E., Melrose, 

Mass. 
Eliason, Miss A. Florence, Glouce- 
ster, Mass. 
Ellery, Mr. Lawrence, Keene, N. H. 
Elliot, Mr. D. Weston, Boston, Mass. 
Elliot, Mrs. Joseph K., Needham, 

Mass. 
Elliott, Mr. John S., Dover, N. H. 
Elliott, Mrs. Robert R., Winchester, 

Mass. 
Ellis, Mrs. Charles A., Bradford, 

Mass. 
Ellis, Mr. Chester, Braintree, Mass. 
Ellis, Mrs. Mabel E., Arlington, 

Mass. 
Ellis, Miss Mary G., Cambridge, 

Mass. 
Emerson, Mr. A. S., Milford, N. H. 
Emerson, Miss Florence M., Wolla- 

ston, Mass. 
Emery, Miss Constance, Portland, 

Maine 
Engelmann, Mr. Carl S., Essex, 

England 
Erickson, Mr. Clifton W., Brockton, 

Mass. 
Estes, Mr. Kendall S., Plymouth, 

Mass. 
Eustis, Mrs. Richard S., Chestnut 

Hill, Mass. 
Evans, Mr. John, Milton, Mass. 
Evans, Mrs. Miner H. A., Wellesley 

Hills, Mass. 
Ewing, Mrs. Charles, Milton, Mass. 
Fahnley, Mr. Paul, Arlington 

Heights, Mass. 
Fairbanks, Mrs. Edwin P., Westboro, 

Mass. 
*Farley, Mrs. John Wells, Needham, 

Mass. 
Farley, Mrs. Mary E., Amherst, 

Mass. 
Fenno, Mrs. C. P., Winchester, 

Mass. 
Ferdinand, Mr. L. W., South 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Ferguson, Mrs. Clem H., Lexington, 

Mass. 
Fernald, Mrs. Guy G., West Con- 
cord, Mass. 
Fife, Mr. Frederick, Amherst, Mass. 
Fife, Mr. George, Attleboro, Mass. 



104 



MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 



Finn, Miss Mary F., Revere, Mass. 

Finnerty, Mr. Fred J., Haverhill, 
Mass. 

Fischer, Mr. Frederic L., Lexington, 
Mass. 

Fish, Mrs. E. R., Windsor, Conn. 

Fisher, Mr. A. N., Jamaica Plain, 
Mass. 

Fisher, Mrs. C. W., Haverhill, Mass. 

Fisher, Mr. Wesley A., Saugus, 
Mass. 

Fisher, Mrs. William, South Boston, 
Mass. 

Fitz, Mrs. Reginald, Brookline, 
Mass. 

*FitzGerald, Mrs. Stephen S., Au- 
burndale, Mass. 

Flagg, Miss Abby E., Hollis, N. H. 

Flahive, Mr. Chester G., Somerville, 
Mass. 

Flannery, Mr. Thomas, Newton Cen- 
ter, Mass. 

Fletcher, Mr. Ernest A., East 
Foxboro, Mass. 

Fletcher, Miss Issa, Everett, Mass. 

Flint, Mr. Henry R., Lincoln. 
Mass. 

Flint, Mr. John G., Chestnut Hill, 
Mass. 

Flint, Mrs. John G., Chestnut Hill, 
Mass. 

Flynn, Mrs. Ann D., Medford, Mass. 

Foley, Miss Margaret M., Brighton, 
Mass. 

Forbes, Mr. Francis W., East Milton, 
Mass. 

Forgie, Mrs. Fraser R., Auburndale, 
Mass. 

Foorgie, Mrs. James T., West Rox- 
bury, Mass. 

Foster, Mrs. Maxwell E., South 
Hamilton, Mass. 

Foye, Rev. Otis W., D. D., Dorches- 
ter, Mass. 

France, Miss Ethel B., New Bed- 
ford, Mass. 

Francis, Mr. Bradford Gale, Maiden, 
Mass. 

Frankenstein, Mr. S. Frank, Brook- 
line, Mass. 

Fraser, Dr. George E., Shawsheen 
Village, Mass. 

Fraser, Mr. Richard A., Framing- 
ham Center, Mass. 

Freeman, Miss Winifred M., Beverly, 
Mass. 

French, Mrs. Howard D., Amherst, 
Mass. 

French, Miss Katharine, Boston, 
Mass. 

Friberg, Mr. Carleton R., Roslin- 
dale, Mass. 

Frymoyer, Mr. W. W., Foxboro, 
Mass. 



Frost, Mrs. Ferdinand A., Haver- 
hill, Mass. 
Frost, Mr. Richard L., Rockport, 

Mass. 
Fuller, Miss Elizabeth S., Newton, 

Mass. 
Fuller, Miss Patricia, Boston, Mass. 
Furlong, Mrs. Maud, Boston, Mass. 
Furniss, Mr. George B., Oakland, 

California 
Furniss, Mrs. Mabel A., Squantum, 

Mass. 
Gade, Mrs. Horace, Concord, Mass. 
Gale, Mr. Edwards J., Boston, Mass. 
Gamsby, Mrs. C. Larratt, Ocala, 

Florida 
Gaposchkin, Mr. Sergei, Lexington, 

Mass. 
Gardner, Deaconess, Edgartown, 

Mass. 
Garland, Mr. Alton C, Dedham, 

Mass. 
Garrison, Miss Rhoda, Waban, 

Mass. 
Garrison, Mrs. William L. Jr., West 

Newton, Mass. 
Gaskill, Mrs. Walter W., Belmont, 

Mass. 
Gates, Mr. Selvyn, Waltham, Mass. 
Gay, Miss Mary L., North Attle- 

boro, Mass. 
Gebauer, Mr. Carl W. Jr., Roslin- 

dale, Mass. 
Geddes, Mr. Frank F., East Milton, 

Mass. 
Genereux, Mr. Paul, East Lynn, 

Mass. 
Gere, Mr. William H., Northampton, 

Mass. 
Gertsch, Mr. Paul H., Gloucester, 

Mass. 
Gibbs, Miss Laura R., Boston 
Gifford, Miss Ida Eliot, South Dart- 
mouth, Mass. 
Gilbert, Mr. S. Alpheus, Norwich, 

Conn. 
Giles, Mrs. Howard, South Wood- 
stock, Vermont 
Gilman, Miss Alice. Lowell, Mass. 
Gilman, Miss Cyvia, Boston, Mass. 
Gilmore, Mr. Albert F., Boston, 

Mass. 
Girdler, Miss Elizabeth L., Beverly, 

Mass. 
Glendy, Dr. R. E., Chestnut Hill, 

Mass. 
Glover, Mrs. George E., Newton- 

ville, Mass. 
Glover, Mrs. W. H., Lawrence, 

Mass. 
Goddard, Mr. James B., Wellesley 

Hills, Mass. 
Goerner, Mrs. G. W., Chestnut Hill, 

Mass. 



NEW MEMBERS, 1937 



105 



Goldsmith, Miss Bessie P., Andover, 
Mass. 

Goodrich, Mr. Hugh H., Lowell, 
Mass. 

Goodspeed, Mrs. Harry B., Wor- 
cester, Mass. 

Gordon, Mr. John, Mattapan, Mass. 

Gosselin, Mr. A. Edmond, Spring- 

. field, Mass. 

Gowron, Mr. John A., Salem, Mass. 

Graves, Miss Irene, Bridgewater, 
Mass. 

Gray, Mrs. Douglas M., Waban, 
Mass. 

Green, Mrs. Albert, Worcester, 
Mass. 

Greene, Mr. H. H., Worcester, Mass. 

Greene, Mrs. Henry Copley, Cam- 
bridge, Mass. 

Greene, Mrs. I. Lloyd, Brookline, 
Mass. 

Greenough, Mrs. Alfred, Mount 
Desert P. O., Maine 

Griffin, Mrs. Lucy F., Winthrop, 
Mass. 

Griffith, Miss Josephine, Milton, 
Mass. 

Haake, Mr. Herbert F., Auburndale, 
Mass. 

Hagan, Miss Ann, Providence, R. I. 

Hale, Mrs. Henry M., Newton Cen- 
tre, Mass. 

Hale, Mrs. Richard K., Brookline, 
Mass. 

Halkler, Mr. William, Dublin, N. H. 

Hall, Miss Edith E., Roxbury, Mass. 

Hall, Mr. George D., Newton Centre, 
Mass. 

Hall, Miss Martha E., Dorchester, 
Mass. 

Hall, Mrs. W. L., West Newton, 
Mass. 

Hammar, Mr. Maurice C, Nashua, 
N. H. 

Hampton, Mrs. A. O., Arlington, 
Mass. 

Hanigan, Mrs. Edward, Newton 
Lower Falls, Mass. 

Hanks, Miss Lenda T., Middleboro, 
Mass. 

Hans, Mr. Egbert, North Billerica, 
Mass. 

Hanson, Miss Edith M., Medford, 
Mass. 

Hanson, Mrs. Paul, Lexington, 
Mass. 

Harding, Mrs. Edgar, Beverly 
Farms, Mass. 

Hardy, Miss Ruth W., Putney, Ver- 
mont 

Harmer, Mrs. Torr Wagner, Win- 
chester, Mass. 

Harrington, Mrs. Alice B., West 
Acton, Mass. 



Harris, Mrs. Charles A., Hanover, 
Mass. 

Harris, Miss Mabel E., Waverley, 
Mass. 

Harrison, Mrs. Fosdick, Canton, 
Mass. 

Hartman, Mrs. John, Shirley Cen- 
ter, Mass. 

Haskell, Miss M. L., South Boston, 
Mass. 

Haskell, Mrs. Roger S., Marblehead, 
Mass. 

Hatch, Mrs. W. P., Boston, Mass. 

Hatfield, Mrs. LeRoy, Braintree, 
Mass. 

Hauthaway, Mrs. C. L., West 
Newton, Mass. 

Havemeyer, Mrs. Arthur, Groton, 
Mass. 

Hawkins, Miss Jessie M., Fairhaven, 
Mass. 

Haynes, Mrs. Winthrop P., Boxford, 
Mass. 

Hayward, Mrs. R. W., Hanover, 
N. H. 

Hebard, Mr. Franklin Adrian, Ply- 
mouth, Mass. 

Hebblethwaite, Miss Edith, Dor- 
chester, Mass. 

Heckman, Mrs. Maddelon, West 
Acton, Mass. 

Hegan, Miss Clara G., Somerville, 
Mass. 

Hegan, Mr. J. H., Assinippi, Mass. 

Henderson, Mr. Everett Spencer, 
Augusta, Maine 

Hermanson, Mrs. Joseph L., Brook- 
line, Mass. 

Hersey, Miss Ethel Gordon, Win- 
chester, Mass. 

Hewitt, Mrs. C. C, Brookline, 
Mass. 

Hewitt, Mr. George, Jamaica Plain, 
Mass. 

Hickey, Mr. Maurice F., Chestnut 
Hill, Mass. 

Highley, Mrs. Harry, Medford, 
Mass. 

Hill, Mr. A. S., Cambridge, Mass. 

Hill, Mrs. Charles E., Dover, N. H. 

Hill, Mrs. Kenneth B., Hingham, 
Mass. 

Hillson, Mrs. Louis, Allston, Mass. 

Hobart, Mrs. Richard B., Concord, 
Mass. 

Hodges, Mrs. Charles E. Jr., 
Beverly Farms, Mass. 

Hoisington, Mrs. H. S., Keene, N. H. 

Holcomb, Mr. Newton, Southwick, 
Mass. 

Holden, Miss Dorothy, Melrose 
Highlands, Mass. 

Holden, Miss Hazel N., Melrose, 
Mass. 



106 



MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 



*Hollingsworth, Mrs. Ellis, Marble- 
head Neck, Mass. 

Hollis, Mrs. Charles B., Boston, 
Mass. 

Holman, Mrs. John, Scituate, Mass. 

Holmes, Mr. Charles L., Newton, 
N. H. 

Holmes, Miss Elizabeth P., Brook- 
line, Mass. 

Holmes, Mrs. Henry W., Cambridge, 
Mass. 

Holscher, Mr. Herman R., Provi- 
dence, R. I. 

Honeywell, Mr. S. G., Delhi, New 
York 

Hopkins, Mrs. A. Lawrence, Cam- 
bridge, Mass. 

Horan, Mr. William F., South Bos- 
ton, Mass. 

Horton, Mr. Irvin, Hingham, Mass. 

Hough, Mrs. B. K., Brookline, 
Mass. 

Houghton, Mrs. Amory, Marion, 
Mass. 

Howard, Mr. Frank, Natick, Mass. 

Howard, Mrs. Ralph, Wellesley, 
Mass. 

Howe, Mrs. Benjamin, Reading, 
Mass. 

Howe, Mrs. H. L., Brookline, Mass. 

Howe, Mr. Richard W., Arlington, 
Mass. 

Howison, Mrs. Gertrude, Milford, 
N. H. 

Hubbard, Mrs. Henry V., Milton, 
Mass. 

Hudson, Mrs. Paul G., West Rox- 
bury, Mass. 

Hughes, Mrs. J. Tandy, Lexington, 
Kentucky 

Hugil, Miss Emilie, Brookline, 
Mass. 

Hull, Miss Edith L., Newton, 
Mass. 

Hunt, Mrs. Alice W., South Easton, 
Mass. 

Hunter, Mrs. Margaret R., Roslin- 
dale, Mass. 

Hurd, Mrs. William R., Beverly, 
Mass. 

Hutton, Mrs. E. W., Arlington, 
Mass. 

Iarrobino, Mr. E., Swampscott, 
Mass. 

Ilfeld, Mrs. Lawrence, West Newton, 
Mass. 

Ingold, Mr. Jack, Madison, Wiscon- 
sin 

Irvine, Mr. Francis T., Antrim, 
N. H. 

Jackson, Mrs. A. M., Winchester, 
Mass. 

Jackson, Mr. Perry S. S., West 
Medford, Mass. 



Jenkinson, Mrs. Henry, Rehoboth, 

Mass. 
Jennings, Mrs. A. F., Winthrop, 

Mass. 
Jewett, Miss Barbara Stevens, 

Beachmont, Mass. 
Johanson, Mr. Herman, Brookline, 

Mass. 
Johanson, Mrs. Roy T., Melrose, 

Mass. 
Johnson, Mr. Alfred, Hyde Park, 

Mass. 
Johnson, Mrs. George V., South 

Portland, Maine 
Johnson, Mrs. J. A., West Roxbury, 

Mass. 
Johnson, Miss Katherine H., Lowell, 

Mass. 
Johnston, Major T. J., Cambridge, 

Mass. 
Jones, Mr. Edward R., Waterbury, 

Conn. 
Joplin, Dr. Robert J., Chestnut 

Hill, Mass. 
Joslin, Mrs. Theodore G., Wash- 
ington, D. C. 
Joyce, Mrs. Peter H., Brookline, 

Mass. 
Karplus, Mrs. Edward, Watertown, 

Mass. 
Kee, Mrs. Allan N., Newton, Mass. 
Keene, Mrs. Charles G., West Rox- 
bury, Mass. 
Keene, Miss Clara R., Brighton, 

Mass. 
Keith, Mrs. Andrew J., Dedham, 

Mass. 
Keith, Mrs. George Knowlton, Graf- 
ton, Mass. 
Keiver, Mrs. Osmund O., Swamp- 
scott, Mass. 
Kelley, Mr. Milton E., Chestnut 

Hill, Mass. 
Kemp, Mrs. George H., Natick, 

Mass. 
Kenison, Mr. Ralph M., Walpole, 

Mass. 
Kennedy, Miss Alicia E. M., Brook- 
line, Mass. 
Kennedy, Mrs. Carl Y., Bath, Maine 
Kennedy, Miss Kathleen A., 

Wellesley, Mass. 
Kenyon, Mr. Harold G., Pittsfield, 

Mass. 
Keown, Mr. Arthur D., Wilkinson- 

ville, Mass. 
Keyes, Mrs. Langley C, Winchester, 

Mass. 
Kimball, Miss Alice, Newtonville, 

Mass. 
King, Mr. Ernest, Needham Heights, 

Mass. 
King, Mrs. Hervey W., Milton, 

Mass. 



XEW MEMBERS. 1937 



107 



King. Miss Isabelle. Belmont, Mass. 

Kingman. Mrs. James, Xewton High- 
lands. Mass. 

Kingman. Mrs. Lauren C, West 
Concord. Mass. 

Kinsman. Dr. Ada R.. Cambridge. 
Mass. 

*Kitching. Mrs. Edward J., Mel- 
rose, Mass. 

Kittredge. Mrs. Henry R., Roslin- 
dale. Mass. 

Knight. Mrs. Perley E., Lynn. Mass. 

Knight. Mrs. R. I., Beverly, Mass. 

Knight. Mrs. Wallace L.. Portland, 
Maine 

Kondrat. Mr. W.. Medway, Mass. 

Kotzschmar, Mrs. Herman, Boston. 
Mass. 

Krone. Mr. Paul R., East Lansing, 
Michigan 

Kyle. Mrs. Peter E.. Lexington. 
Mass. 

LaCroix. Mrs. Morris F., Chestnut 
Hill. Mass. 

Lane. Miss Florence M., Brookline. 
Mass. 

Lane. Mr. Harry. Centerville. Mass. 

Lane. Mrs. Walter A.. Milton. Mass. 

Langley, Mr. Horace W. Jr., Xatick. 
Mass. 

Lannefeld. Mrs. Walter E.. Arling- 
ton. Mass. 

Larson. Mrs. Laura E.. Saugus, 
Mass. 

Lautten. Mrs. Harry, Bay Shore. 
Long Island. X. Y. 

Lawrence. Mrs. Carl A. P.. Groton. 
Mass. 

Lawrence. Miss Madeleine. Boston. 
Mass. 

Lazenby. Mr. Francis C. W.. Read- 
ing. Mass. 

Leach. Mrs. H. T.. Rumford. Maine 

Lear. Mr. Harry W.. Danvers, 
Mass. 

Leavitt. Mrs. Byron C. Millbrook. 
ZMass. 

Leavitt. Mrs. John S.. Dorchester, 
Mass. 

Lee. Mrs. Madison. Danville, 
Kentucky 

Lee. Mr. Roland E., Pensacola. 
Florida 

Lehnherr. Mr. Earl R.. Brookline. 
Mass. 

Leith, Mrs. Elizabeth B., Scituate, 
Mass. 

Leland. Mrs. Oliver S.. West Xew- 
ton. Mass. 

Leonard, Mrs. Harriet C, Province- 
town. Mass. 

Letourneau, Mr. Albert G., Marble- 
head. Mass. 

Lewis, Miss Cait, Stratford. Conn. 



Lewis. Mrs. George. Boston, Mass. 
Liacos. Mrs. Vasil, Pepperell, 

Mass. 
Libby. Mrs. Edward X.. Jamaica 

Plain, Mass. 
Libby, Miss Sarah, West Roxbury, 

Mass. 
Lieder. Mrs. F. W. C. Cambridge. 

Mass. 
Liese, Miss Blanche I., West Acton. 

Mass. 
Lightfoot. Miss Gladys M., Xew 

York City 
Lincoln. Mr. Edwin C, Hingham. 

Mass. 
Lincoln. Mr. Elbridge B.. Shirley. 

Mass. 
Lincoln. Miss Helen A., Xorth 

Easton. Mass. 
Lindenfelcer, Mrs. J. A.. Wollaston. 

Mass. 
Lindstrom, Mr. Oscar. Attleboro, 

Mass. 
Linehan. Mrs. Frances, Swampscott. 

Mass. 
Lishon, Mrs. L. J.. Xewtonville. 

Mass. 
Litchfield. Miss Margaret E., Xorth 

Scituate, Mass. 
Little. Mrs. Richard M.. East Wey- 
mouth. Mass. 
Lockwood. Mrs. Dunbar, Boston. 

Mass. 
Loder. Dr. Halsey B., Boston. Mass. 
Lodding. Mrs. B. T.. Wollaston. 

Mass. 
Loew. Mr. Elias M., Hyde Park, 

Mass. 
Long. Mrs. Ada E.. Bedford. Mass. 
Longmire. Mr. A. M.. West Somer- 

ville. Mass. 
Lord. Mr. Clifton F. Jr.. Everett, 

Mass. 
Lord, Mrs. R. H. W., Woburn, 

Mass. 
Loring. Mrs. Atherton Jr., Boston. 

Mass. 
Loring, Mrs. David. Waban. Mass. 
Loring, Miss Marjorie. Boston. 

Mass. 
Loungway. R.ev. Ferdinand J., 

Jamaica Plain. Mass. 
Loveland, Mrs. Sterling X., Xewton. 

Mass. 
Lovell. Mrs. Howard B., Brookline. 

Mass. 
Loveren, Miss A. Gertrude. Medford. 

Mass. 
Lovett. Mr. Wallace R.. Melrose. 

Mass. 
Lowe. Mrs. Millard D., Stoughton, 

Mass. 
Lucas, Mr, William E., Allston. 

Mass. 



108 



MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 



Lund, Mrs. Charles Carroll, Chest- 
nut Hill, Mass. 
Lyman, Mrs. Charles F. Jr., Marble- 
head, Mass. 
MacAdden, Mr. W. T., Wellesley 

Hills, Mass. 
MacAviney, Mrs. James B., Quincy, 

Mass. 
MacBrayne, Mrs. Lewis E., Belmont, 

Mass. 
MacColl, Mr. William B., Bristol, 

R. I. 
MacDonald, Mrs. C. J., Dedham, 

Mass. 
MacDonald, Mr. Colin F., Brockton, 

Mass. 
MacFawn, Mr. Herbert T., East 

Weymouth, Mass. 
Mackey, Mrs. Edward M., Boston, 

Mass. 
Mackey, Miss Mary O., Cambridge, 

Mass. 
MacLeod, Mr. Murdock, Arlington, 

Mass. 
MacMeehan, Mrs. T. S., Sharon, 

Mass. 
Macomber, Mrs. Alexander, Boston, 

Mass. 
MacPhie, Mrs. E. I., West Newton, 

Mass. 
Maddocks, Mrs. John A., Winchester, 

Mass. 
Magee, Mr. J. Henderson, Wellesley 

Hills, Mass. 
Maguire, Mrs. Peter J., Boston, 

Mass. 
Mahoney, Mrs. Dennis J., Boston, 

Mass. 
Margeson, Mrs. Harold L., Melrose, 

Mass. 
Marlin, Mrs. J. E., Gloucester, 

Mass. 
Marsden, Mr. Thomas A. Jr., Dur- 
ham N. H. 
Marsh, Dr. Daniel L., Brookline, 

Mass. 
Marsh, Miss Mabel, Brookline, 

Mass. 
Marshall, Miss Florence E., 

Jamaica Plain, Mass. 
Marshall, Mrs. Lewis C, Norwood, 

Mass. 
Martin, Mr. Harold W., Weston, 

Mass. 
Martin, Mrs. Harold W., Weston, 

Mass. 
Martovana, Mrs. A. J., Chestnut 

Hill, Mass. 
Marvel, Mrs. Harry E., Brookline, 

Mass. 
Maryott, Mr. C. H., Augusta, 

Georgia 
Mason, Mrs. Edward S., Cambridge, 

Mass. 



Mason, Mrs. John Carlton, North 

Easton, Mass. 
Masters, Mrs. J. E., Chestnut Hill, 

Mass. 
Mather, Mrs. Eugene H., Brookline, 

Mass. 
Matherson, Mrs. Sylvia, Middle- 

boro, Mass. 
Matthews, Mrs. Charles E. W., Ux- 

bridge, Mass. 
Mattus, Mr. Frank, Worcester, 
May, Mrs. Ralph, Cambridge, Mass. 
Mayall, Mr. R. Newton, Cambridge, 

Mass. 
Mayall, Mrs. R. Newton, Cambridge, 

Mass. 
Mayberry, Mrs. Robert M., Lynn, 

Mass. 
Maynard, Mrs. Sylvia H., Lynnfleld, 

Mass. 
Mayo, Miss Marian K., Wellesley, 

Mass. 
McBride, Mrs. Roena, Brownsville, 

Vermont 
McCarthy, Mrs. Louis, Chestnut 

Hill, Mass. 
McCarty, Mrs. Clinton A., Waban, 

Mass. 
McClay, Mrs. Esther T., Mattapan, 

Mass. 
McClunin, Mr. Fred A., Lexington. 

Mass. 
McConville, Mr. Francis, Framing- 
ham Center, Mass. 
McGovern, Mrs. James, Winchester, 

Mass. 
McGrath, Mrs. Matthew L., West 

Roxbury, Mass. 
McKeen, Mrs. Ellis W., Conway, 

N.H. 
McKenzie, Dr. Malcolm A., Am- 
herst, Mass. 
McKinney, Mrs. Harold N., Roxbury, 

Mass. 
McLeod, Miss Dorothy C, Boston, 

Mass. 
McLeod, Mrs. James, Waltham, 

Mass. 
McLeod, Miss Margaret R., Roslin- 

dale, Mass. 
McLeod, Dr. Ralph C, Brockton, 

Mass. 
McPhee, Miss Augusta, Rowley, 

Mass. 
McPherson, Mrs. William P., Wor- 
cester, Mass. 
McQuaid, Mrs. S. A., North Billerica, 

Mass. 
McSweeney, Dr. Daniel J., Milton, 

Mass. 
Mead, Miss Elizabeth, Pittsfleld, 

Mass. 
Meader, Mrs. W. Granville, North 

Providence, R. I. 



NEW MEMBERS, 1937 



109 



Meek, Mrs. Dorothy T., East Natick, 

Mass. 
Meigs, Mr. Ralph R., North Wil- 
mington, Mass. 
Mele, Mr. John, Weston, Mass. 
Meloon, Mr. Alfred, New Castle, 

N. H. 
Merrill, Mrs. John Prosper, Milton 

Mass. 
Merritt, Miss Ella M., South Wey- 
mouth, Mass. 
Miller, Mrs. Alice G., Reading, 

Mass. 
Millikan, Mr. M. M., Newton Centre, 

Mass. 
Milliken, Mrs. Warren, Wellesley 

Hills, Mass. 
Mills, Miss Susan L., Boston, Mass. 
Minns, Miss Grace W., Chestnut 

Hill, Mass. 
Minott, Mrs. Charles V., Roxbury, 

Mass. 
Modricker, Mrs. Mary E., Jamaica 

Plain, Mass. 
Moller, Mrs. Kenneth, Milton, Mass. 
Moloney, Mrs. James F., Swamp- 

scott, Mass. 
Moncure, Mr. Robert C, Alexandria, 

Virginia 
Monroe, Mrs. John I., Brookline, 

Mass. 
Moore, Mrs. E. Herman, Cambridge, 

Mass. 
Moore, Mr. Walter F., Gloucester, 

Mass. 
Moran, Mr. H. W., Rockland, Mass. 
Moran, Mr. John B., Attleboro, 

Mass. 
Morris, Mrs. Ira Nelson, New York 

City 
Morrison, Mr. Paul C, East Boston, 

Mass. 
Morse, Miss Eleanor C, Milton, 

Mass. 
Morse, Mrs. Sadie May, Marble- 
head Neck, Mass. 
Morse, Mrs. William G., Cambridge, 

Mass. 
Morss, Mrs. Everett, Chestnut Hill, 

Mass. 
Munday, Mr. Ernest F., Brighton, 

Mass. 
Munro, Dr. Rose C, Boston, Mass. 
Munroe, Mr. Duncan, Cambridge, 

Mass. 
Munroe, Mrs. Philip A., Watertown, 

Mass. 
Murphy, Mrs. J. A., Boston, Mass. 
Murphy, Mrs. Richard F., Charles- 
town, Mass. 
Murray, Mr. Henry S., Concord, 

Mass. 
Murray, Mr. Thomas, Marblehead, 

Mass. 



Musgrove, Miss Mary D., Bristol, 

N. H. 
Myers, Mrs. Robert C, Newton 

Lower Falls, Mass. 
Nash, Mrs. S. A., Newton Centre, 

Mass. 
Nason, Mrs. Chester, Hyde Park, 

Mass. 
Nason, Mr. George P., Medford, 

Mass. 
Neal, Mr. Forrest I., Quincy, 

Mass. 
Neilson, Mrs. A. S., Chestnut Hill, 

Mass. 
Nelson, Mr. John C, Framingham, 

Mass. 
Newhall, Miss Avalena C, Hingham, 

Mass. 
Newhall, Mrs. Herbert W., Lynn, 

Mass. 
Newton, Mrs. Harland B., Lincoln, 

Mass. 
Newton, Miss Hazel, Waltham, 

Mass. 
Nichols, Miss Helen C, Harwich, 

Mass. 
Nichols, Mrs. John H., Brookline, 

Mass. 
Nichols, Mrs. John H. Jr., Newton 

Centre, Mass. 
Nichols, Miss Mary L., Amesbury, 

Mass. 
Noonan, Mr. John H., Boston, Mass. 
Noone, Mrs. George H., Newton 

Centre, Mass. 
Norris, Mrs. Richard, Chestnut Hill, 

Mass. 
Norton, Mr. H. E., Lansing, 

Michigan 
Norwood, Mrs. Charles Augustus, 

Brookline, Mass. 
Noyes, Mrs. Harry K., West Newton, 

Mass. 
Nunan, Mrs. Thomas R., Newton 

Centre, Mass. 
Nye, Mrs. William A., Boston 
Nye, Mr. William F. Jr., Spring- 
field, Mass. 
O'Brian, Miss Katharine P., Lowell, 

Mass. 
O'Brien, Mrs. William S., Abington, 

Mass. 
Odiorne, Mrs. John A., Wellesley 

Hills, Mass. 
O'Donnell, Mr. Vincent, Lynn, Mass. 
O'Hare, Mrs. James P., Chestnut 

Hill, Mass. 
O'Keefe, Mrs. Philip T., Boston, 

Mass. 
Oliver, Mr. Antone, Nantucket, 

Mass. 
O'Moran, Mr. Paul, Revere, Mass. 
Onthank, Miss Charlotte, North- 

boro, Mass. 



110 



MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 



Orlandini, Mrs. Vittorio, Boston, 

Mass. 
O'Rourke, Miss Katharine D., Brock- 
ton, Mass. 
Osgood, Mrs. H. Bishop, Lexington, 

Mass. 
Ouimet, Mr. Francis, Wellesley 

Hills, Mass. 
Palmer, Mrs. R. Whitman, Boston, 

Mass. 
Parker, Mrs. E. Allen, Newton 

Lower Falls, Mass. 
Parker, Miss Ednah B., Cambridge, 

Mass. 
Parker, Mrs. John S., Charles River, 

Mass. 
Parkinson, Mr. J. N., Methuen, 

Mass. 
Parks, Mrs. T. Fulton, Wakefield, 

Mass. 
Parsons, Mrs. W. J., Oakham, Mass. 
Patch, Mr. James A., Carlisle, 

Mass. 
Paterson, Mrs. Norman I., Newton 

Lower Falls, Mass. 
Patten, Mrs. Lewis W., Raynham, 

Mass. 
Paul, Miss Ruth, Marshfield, Mass. 
Peabody, Miss Gertrude W., Boston, 

Mass. 
Peabody, Mrs. R. H., Middleton, 

Mass. 
Peach, Mr. Channin, Foxboro, Mass. 
Pearce, Mrs. Miriam B., Newton, 

Mass. 
Pearson, Mrs. Ricardo M., Buenos 

Aires, South America 
Peck, Mr. Lucius B., Needham, 

Mass. 
Pennells, Mrs. Henry B., Cohasset, 

Mass. 
Peppeard, Miss Augusta, Boston, 

Mass. 
Perkins, Mrs. G. Holmes, Boston, 

Mass. 
Perry, Mrs. W. G., West Medford, 

Mass. 
Peter, Mrs. Marc Jr., Boston, Mass. 
Peterson, Mr. Edmund A., North 

Weymouth, Mass. 
Pettit, Mrs. Kathreen Noyes, Fram- 

ingham Centre, Mass. 
Pfaelzer, Mrs. Franklin T. Jr., 

Brookline, Mass. 
Phelps, Miss Eleanor, Wellesley, 

Mass. 
Philbric, Mrs. Charles M., Salem, 

Mass. 
Philbrick, Miss Helen, Wellesley 

Hills, Mass. 
Phillips, Mrs. Arthur J., West Pea- 
body, Mass. 
Phillips, Miss Helen E., West Pea- 
body, Mass. 



Phippen, Mrs. Ina T., Belmont, 

Mass. 
Phipps, Mrs. George R., Winchester, 

Mass. 
Pickering, Mrs. Herbert R., 

Swampscott, Mass. 
Pierce, Mrs. C. Eaton, Hingham, 

Mass. 
Pierce, Miss Marjorie, Lexington, 

Mass. 
Pierce, Mr. Roger, Milton, Mass. 
Pike, Mrs. Carleton, Boston, Mass. 
Pillsbury, Mr. Frank E., West 

Bridgewater, Mass. 
Pinkus, Mr. Ralph, Bronx, 

New York 
Plout, Mr. L. Ernest, Merrimac, 

Mass. 
Pomeroy, Miss Grace L., Roxbury, 

Mass. 
Porter, Mrs. Charles H,, Cambridge, 

Mass. 
Potter, Mr. John, Hyde Park, 

Mass. 
Potter, Mrs. William H. Jr., 

Boston, Mass. 
Potts, Mr. Harry L., Saugus, Mass. 
Powers, Mrs. Edith F., Taunton, 

Mass. 
Pratt, Mrs. Wallace W., Hingham 

Center, Mass. 
Pree, Mrs. Henry L., Hudson, Ohio 
Preston, Mr. Raymond E., Lynn, 

Mass. 
Prichard, Mrs. Josephine S., 

Annisquam, Mass. 
Pride, Mr. Edward W., West 

Newton, Mass. 
Proctor, Miss Cora R., Dorchester, 

Mass. 
Prouty, Mrs. George S., Watertown, 

Mass. 
Purington, Mrs. Ellison S., 

Gloucester, Mass. 
Purinton, Mrs. George, New 

Sharon, Maine 
Putnam, Miss Lena M., Framing- 
ham, Mass. 
Putnam, Mr. Willard S., Cohasset, 

Mass. 
Quinn, Mrs. Edwin C, North 

Weymouth, Mass. 
Racz, Miss Rosalind L., Cambridge, 

Mass. 
Radack, Mr. Sigmond, Manchester, 

Mass. 
Ramsey, Mr. W. K. f Worcester, 

Mass. 
Rand, Mrs. Edward K., Cambridge, 

Mass. 
Randall, Mr. Edward E., Reading, 

Mass. 
Randall, Miss Margaret E„ 

Winchester, Mass. 



NEW MEMBERS, 1937 



111 



Randlett, Mrs. Harold S., Melrose, 

Mass. 
Rankin, Mrs. W. F., Atlantic, Mass. 
^Raymond, Mrs. Arthur C, Bass 

River, Mass. 
Raymond, Dr. Mabel C, Wrentham, 

Mass. 
Raymond, Mr. William A., South 

Easton, Mass. 
Razee, Mr. A. W., Winchester, Mass. 
Reed, Mrs. Charles W., Brookline, 

Mass. 
Reichardt, Mr. Otis Norcross, 

Reading, Mass. 
Rembaum, Mr. Joseph, Winthrop, 

Mass. 
Renfrew, Mrs. Susan W., Cam- 
bridge, Mass. 
Renn, Mrs. Richard J., Brockton, 

Mass. 
Reynolds, Miss Gertrude, Brookline, 

Mass. 
Reynolds, Mr. Thomas M., West 

Roxbury, Mass. 
Rhees, Mrs. Morgan J., Boston, 

Mass. 
Rhoades, Mrs. Herbert A., Brain- 
tree, Mass. 
Rice, Mrs. Edmund, Dover, Mass. 
Rice, Miss Ellen C, Lancaster, Mass. 
Rice, Miss Emily D., Brighton, 

Mass. 
Rice, Mrs. George B., Brookline, 

Mass. 
Rice, Mrs. Irving D., Dover, N. H. 
Rich, Mrs. D. B., Newton Centre, 

Mass. 
Rich, Mr. Howard, Atlantic, Maine 
Richards, Mr. A., Wellesley, Mass. 
Richards, Mr. Henry H., Groton, 

Mass. 
Richardson, Mr. George E., Melrose 

Highlands, Mass. 
Richardson, Mrs. George E., 

Hopedale, Mass. 
Richardson, Mrs. H. H., Brookline, 

Mass. 
Richardson, Miss Susan L., 

Winchester, Mass. 
Richmond, Mrs. D. E., 

Williamstown, Mass. 
Ricker, Mrs. Myron J., Alfred, 

Maine 
Riley, Mrs. W. H., Marblehead, 

Mass. 
Rissland, Mrs. Karl, Boston, Mass. 
Ritchie, Mrs. Alva B., Chestnut Hill, 

Mass. 
Robertson, Mrs. George, West 

Roxbury, Mass. 
Robinson, Miss Alida L., 

Winchester, Mass. 
Robinson, Mrs. Edward S., 

Brookline, Mass. 



Robinson, Mrs. Hope D., Belmont, 

Mass. 
Rogers, Mr. Chester G., Braintree, 

Mass. 
Rogers, Mrs. W. Hubert, Brookline, 

Mass. 
Rolfe, Mrs. Hay ward P., Newton, 

Mass. 
Rosebault, Mrs. Charles J., 

Rockport, Mass. 
Rosen, Mr. George H., Brookline, 

Mass. 
Rosenfield, Mrs. Harold, Brookline, 

Mass. 
Rosenthal, Mr. William, 

Newtonville, Mass. 
Ross, Mr. Henry C, Boston, Mass. 
Rouillard, Mr. Robert G., 

Watertown, Mass. 
Roukes, Miss M. Gertrude, Melrose 

Highlands, Mass. 
Rowe, Mrs. William A., East 

Gloucester, Mass. 
Rowley, Mrs. Charles F., 

Chestnut Hill, Mass. 
Rumrill, Mr. Frank, Newton Center, 

Mass. 
Russell, Mr. Frederick A., Boston, 

Mass. 
Ruth, Mr. Fred R. ( Sharon, Mass. 
Ryan, Miss Lucille, Rangeley, Maine 
Ryan, Mrs. William F., West 

Newton, Mass. 
Saabel, Mr. Klaus, Yonkers, 

New York 
Safford, Mr. George, Wellesley 

Hills, Mass. 
Sanborn, Mrs. Clifford, Norwood, 

Mass. 
Sanborn, Miss Josephine L., 

Haverhill, Mass. 
Sanders, Mrs. Thomas H., 

Cambridge, Mass. 
Sanderson, Mr. Bennett, Littleton, 

Mass. 
Sanford, Mr. S. N. F., Boston, 

Mass. 
Sands, Mrs. Rachel, Beverly, Mass. 
Saunders, Miss Frances, Belmont, 

Mass. 
Saunders, Mrs. Frederick A., 

Cambridge, Mass. 
Sawyer, Mrs. Charles F., Dalton, 

Mass. 
Say ward, Mrs. Perceval, Needham, 

Mass. 
Scamman, Miss J. E., Wakefield, 

Mass. 
Scammell, Mrs. John C, Milton, 

Mass. 
Scanlon, Mrs. William, South 

Lincoln, Maine 
Scannell, Mrs. David D., Jamaica 

Plain, Mass. 



112 



MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 



Schaefer, Mr. Henry F., Jamaica 

Plain, Mass. 
Schlesinger, Mrs. Arthur M., 

Cambridge, Mass. 
Schlotterbeck, Mrs. Lewis, Wake- 
field, Mass. 
Schnackenberg, Mrs. A. E., 

Durham, N. H. 
Schultz, Mrs. Andrew, Wellesley 

Hills, Mass. 
Schwartz, Mrs. Ida H., Winter Hill, 

Mass. 
Scott, Mr. Clifford, North Easton, 

Mass. 
Scott, Mrs. Donald, Cambridge, 

Mass. 
Scott, Miss Marion, Brookline, Mass. 
Scott, Mr. R. J., Cambridge, Mass. 
Sears, Miss Evelyn G., Boston, Mass. 
Seccomb, Mrs. Eben D., Boston, 

Mass. 
Seeglitz, Mrs. William, Peabody, 

Mass. 
Selya, Mrs. H. P., Chestnut Hill, 

Mass. 
Shadman, Mrs. Louise W., Newton, 

Mass. 
Shane, Capt. Louis, U. S. N. 

South Braintree, Mass. 
Sharp, Mrs. Albert R., Brookline, 

Mass. 
Shattuck, Mrs. Joseph, Chatham, 

Mass. 
Shaw, Mrs. Arthur L., Auburndale, 

Mass. 
Shaw, Mrs. Carleton A., Groton, 

Mass. 
Shaw, Mrs. M. M., Portland, Maine 
Shaw, Miss Mildred E., North 

Abington, Mass. 
Shaw, Mrs. Sohier, Boston, Mass. 
Shay, Mrs. William A., Beach Bluff, 

Mass. 
Shepardson, Mrs. Robert B., 

Reading, Mass. 
Sherman, Miss Elizabeth J., 

Framingham, Mass. 
Sherrill, Mrs. Henry Knox, 

Boston, Mass. 
Shirk, Mrs. C. Marshall, Boston, 

Mass. 
Shurtleff, Mr. Lewis T., Fairhaven, 

Mass. 
Sides, Mr. Arthur W., North 

Hanover, Mass. 
Simas, Mrs. Charles, Taunton, Mass. 
Simoneau, Mr. George J., 

Claremont, N. H. 
Singleton, Mrs. Frederick A., 

Brookline, Mass. 
Skolfield, Mrs. George R., 

Brunswick, Maine 
Slater, Mrs. John C, Cambridge, 

Mass. 



Sloan, Miss Thomasina, R. N., 

Boston, Mass. 
Small, Mrs. Thomas, Brookline, 

Mass. 
Smart, Miss Alpha J., Revere, Mass. 
Smith, Mrs. Charles Gaston, 

Brookline, Mass. 
Smith, Mr. Charles L., Needham, 

Mass. 
Smith, Miss Edith H., Dedham, 

Mass. 
Smith, Mr. Ernest A., Holliston, 

Mass. 
Smith, Miss Marion, Saugus, Mass. 
Smith, Mr. Robert A., Milton, Mass. 
Smith, Mrs. Thomas Page, Hing- 

ham, Mass. 
Snyder, Mrs. Arthur, Hingham, 

Mass. 
Soule, Miss Clara G., Newton, Mass. 
Spencer, Mrs. William S., 

Cambridge, Mass. 
Spalding, Mr. George H., Guilford, 

Conn. 
Spaulding, Mrs. Franklin F., 

Tewksbury, Mass. 
Sperry, Mrs. Marcy L., Milton, 

Mass. 
Spieler, Mr. George M., Holbrook, 

Mass. 
Stanwood, Mrs. William E., 

Wellesley Hills, Mass. 
Staples, Mr. Elmer C, Amherst, 

Mass. 
Stearns, Mr. C. A., North Quincy, 

Mass. 
Steffek, Mr. Edwin F., Boston, 

Mass. 
Stevens, Mr. Clyde E., Natick, 

Mass. 
Stevens, Mr. Robert F., Amherst, 

Mass. 
Stevenson, Miss Margaret, Boston, 

Mass. 
Stevenson, Miss Virginia Parker, 

Wellesley, Mass. 
Stewart, Mr. Alfred V., Biddeford, 

Maine 
Stickney, Mrs. Lewis E., Arlington 

Heights, Mass. 
Stillings, Mrs. Herbert S., North 

Andover, Mass. 
Stockwell, Miss Bertha A., 

Brookline, Mass. 
Stockwell, Mr. Ernest Farnham, 

Winchester, Mass. 
Stone, Mr. H. S., Lexington, Mass. 
Stone, Mrs. W. S., Lynn, Mass. 
Storm, Mrs. Henry H., East 

Braintree, Mass. 
Street, Miss Grace E., Cambridge, 

Mass. 
Stretch, Mrs. Charles B., Brockton, 

Mass. 



NEW MEMBERS, 1937 



113 



Stuart, Mrs. Frederick W., South 

Boston, Mass. 
Stuart, Mr. Roger, Dorchester 

Center, Mass. 
Stuart, Mrs. Roger, Dorchester 

Center, Mass. 
Sugden, Mrs. Walter J., West 

Roxbury, Mass. 
Sullivan, Mr. Arthur J., Maynard, 

Mass. 
Sullivan, Mrs. D. A., Dorchester, 

Mass. 
Sullivan, Miss Helen E., Roslindale, 

Mass. 
Swann, Mr. Arthur H., South 

Braintree, Mass. 
Swett, Mrs. Ralph W., Wellesley, 

Mass. 
Sykes, Mrs. Maxwell H., Billerica, 

Mass. 
Sylvester, Mrs. Herbert S., Middle- 

boro, Mass. 
Synnott, Mrs. Thomas Whitney 2nd, 

Haddonfield, N. J. 
Taber, Mrs. Wendell, Boston, Mass. 
Tapper, Mr. Oscar, Falmouth, Mass. 
Tarr, Mrs. Leslie E., Gloucester, 

Mass. 
Tarr, Mrs. Lewis, Gloucester, Mass. 
Tauber, Mrs. Frederick, Melrose, 

Mass. 
Taylor, Mrs. Earl W., Belmont, 

Mass. 
Taylor, Miss Edna D., Greenwood, 

Mass. 
Taylor, Miss Myrthena E., Boston, 

Mass. 
Taylor, Mrs. Stephen H., Wollaston, 

Mass. 
Taylor, Mrs. Warner V., West New- 
ton, Mass. 
Teague, Miss Alice R., Jamaica 

Plain, Mass. 
TenBroeck, Mr. Stanton J. Jr., 

Newton Center, Mass. 
Terry, Mr. Stanley W., Quincy, 

Mass. 
Thayer, Mrs. Sherman Rand, 

Cohasset, Mass. 
Thomas, Mr. F. O., Taunton, 

Mass. 
Thompson, Mr. Charles G., New 

York City 
Thompson, Mrs. Herbert, Lowell, 

Mass. 
Thornton, Mrs. Henry, Brookline, 

Mass. 
Tinkham, Mr. R. E., Boston, Mass. 
Titus, Mrs. Harvey O., Cambridge, 

Mass. 
Tobey, Mrs. Eugene C, Portland, 

Maine 
Tomlinson, Mrs. Harvey S., Salem, 

Mass. 



Toon, Miss Phyllis Adams, West 

Roxbury, Mass. 
Topp, Mr.- W. S., Groton, Mass. 
Towle, Mrs. George P., Dorchester, 

Mass. 
Trainor, Mrs. J. Fred, Braintree, 

Mass. 
Trimble, Miss Suzanne H., Roches- 
ter, New York 
Tripp, Mrs. Christie, Marion, Mass. 
Trowbridge, Miss Miriam, Boston, 

Mass. 
Trudinger, Mr. John, Lynn, Mass. 
Tucker, Mrs. Edwin D., Boston, 

Mass. 
Tucker, Mr. Frederick, Marlboro. 

Mass. 
Turner, Mr. A. B., Harwichport, 

Mass. 
Tuttle, Mrs. Arthur S., Reading, 

Mass. 
Twombly, Mrs. Henry B., Wakefield, 

Mass. 
Underhill, Mrs. Robert L. M., 

Concord, Mass. 
Upton, Mrs. George, Mathews Court 

House, Virginia 
VanDuyne, Mrs. Frederick W., 

Brookline, Mass. 
Van Gorder, Mrs. George W.. 

Waban, Mass. 
VanTwuyver, Mr. Klaas, Quincy, 

Mass. 
VanVliet, Mrs. Kate, Boston, Mass. 
Vasaturo, Mr. Pasquale, Medfield, 

Mass. 
Vason, Mrs. Robert D., Cambridge, 

Mass. 
Vasumpaur, Mrs. George J., 

Western Springs, Illinois 
VerPlanck, Mrs. W. Everett, Salem, 

Mass. 
Vidler, Mrs. L. Edith, Melrose, 

Mass. 
Vining, Mr. Kenneth R., New 

Bedford, Mass. 
Waite, Dr. Anne L., Chicago, 

Illinois 
Walden, Mrs. Clarence E., Needham, 

Mass. 
Walker, Mrs. Helen W., Providence, 

R. I. 
Walker, Mrs. William S., Milton, 

Mass. 
Walsh, Miss Catherine E., Lynn, 

Mass. 
Walsh, Mrs. J. J., Quincy, Mass. 
Walsh, Miss Mary, Chicago, Illinois 
Ward, Mr. Edward A., Jersey City, 

N. J. 
Waterman, Mr. Fred T., Scituate, 

Mass. 
Waterman, Mrs. Joseph S., 

Newton Center, Mass. 



114 



MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 



Waters, Mr. Robert M., Wellesley, 

Mass. 
Weatherbee, Mrs. E. E., North 

Quincy, Mass. 
Webb, Mrs. Frank R., Beach Bluff, 

Mass. 
Weber, Mrs. T. F., Newton Center, 

Mass. 
Weeman, Miss Lois M., 

Bridgewater, Mass. 
Welch, Miss Mary E., Somerville, 

Mass. 
Weld, Mrs. Bernard C, Boston, 

Mass. 
Welsh, Mrs. Madison F., Fall River, 

Mass. 
Welsh, Mrs. R. E,, West Roxbury, 

Mass. 
Werly, Mr. Charles M., Winchester, 

Mass. 
Weston, Mrs. Robert D., Cambridge, 

Mass. 
Westwood, Mr. Thomas H. Jr., West 

Roxbury, Mass. 
Wheatland, Mrs. Stephen, Brookline, 

Mass. 
Wheeler, Mrs. Wilfrid, Hatchville, 

Mass. 
Whidden, Mrs. Thomas A., Jamaica 

Plain, Mass. 
Whipple, Mr. Bertram F., 

Lexington, Mass. 
White, Mrs. Charles A., Boston, 

Mass. 
White, Mrs. E. Laurence, Beverly 

Farms, Mass. 
White, Mr. John Jr., Jamaica Plain, 

Mass. 
White, Mr. Joseph W., Wellesley 

Hills, Mass. 
White, Mr. Leslie R., Newton, Mass. 
White, Miss Nancy P., Boston, Mass. 
White, Miss Ruth M., Worcester, 

Mass. 
Whitehill, Mr. Walter M., North 

Andover, Mass. 
Whitney, Mrs. Frederic P., 

Pittsfield, Mass. 
Whitney, Mr. Harold L., Arlington, 

Mass. 
Whittier, Miss Helen, Gardner, 

Mass. 
Whittle, Mrs. Joseph, Adamsville, 

R. I. 
Wier, Mr. George S., Saundersville, 

Mass. 
Wight, Mr. Thomas F., Dorchester, 

Mass. 
Wilder, Mr. Myron F., Melrose 

Highlands, Mass. 



Wiley, Mr. Robert M., Fall River, 

Mass. 
Wilkinson, Mr. G. Harper, 

Pensacola, Florida 
Wilkinson, Mrs. Holley A., 

Needham, Mass. 
Williams, Mrs. Channing, Jamaica 

Plain, Mass. 
Williams, Mrs. Charles A., 

Winthrop, Mass. 
Williams, Mrs. Harold G., Beverly, 

Mass. 
Williams, Miss Margaret, 

Annisquam, Mass. 
Williams, Mr. Thomas, Chesham, 

N. H. 
Williams, Mr. W. M. Jr., 

Providence, R. I. 
Willis, Mrs. R. S., Newton Center, 

Mass. 
Winant, Mrs. Frederick Jr., 

Ipswich, Mass. 
Winchester, Mr. Artemas, Jamaica 

Plain, Mass. 
Winn, Mr. Harry T., Winchester, 

Mass. 
Winsor, Mr. Thomas K., Greenville, 

R. I. 
Winton, Mrs. Mary E., Roxbury, 

Mass. 
Wittmann, Mr. Joseph, Madeira, 

Ohio 
Wood, Mr. James, Arlington, Mass. 
Woodall, Dr. James Martin, 

Jamaica Plain, Mass. 
Woolley, Miss Cornelia M., 

Brighton, Mass. 
Worthen, Mrs. Eva, Cambridge, 

Mass. 
Wortman, Mrs. Benjamin, Maiden, 

Mass. 
Woundy, Mrs. George W., 

Newburyport, Mass. 
Wright, Mrs. J. Arnold, New 

Bedford, Mass. 
Wyman, Mrs. James T., Brighton, 

Mass. 
Yapp, Mrs. Mary E., Littleton, 

Mass. 
Yates, Mr. Walter, West Manchester, 

Mass. 
Yoffe, Miss Mildred G., Chestnut 

Hill, Mass. 
Youman, Mrs. D. H., Medway, 

Mass. 
Young, Mr. Philip, Boston, Mass. 
Zevitas, Mr. Ernest J., Roxbury, 

Mass. 
Zink, Miss Marion E., Revere, Mass. 
*Life Members 



Bequests to the Massachusetts 
Horticultural Society 

It is hoped by the Massachusetts Horticultural Society 
that it will not be forgotten by members who find it expedient 
to make their wills. This Society's financial condition is sound 
and its investments are good, but the income from many of its 
investments has declined because of decreased returns from its 
bond holdings. Expenses have naturally increased with the 
constantly growing membership, and more money is needed to 
extend the activities of the Society beyond its present limits. 
The following form of bequest is suggested: 

FORM OF BEQUEST 



I give and bequeath to the Massachusetts Horticultural 

Society located in Boston, Massachusetts, the sum of 

to be used as the Board of Trustees 

may direct for the promotion of horticulture in its various 
forms and for extending the activities of the Society along 
educational lines. 

Signed 






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